Photographer Robbert Flick

Viewing Los Angeles through the lens of a camera. What do you see? What do you see literally? In the book Rethinking Los Angeles, Michael Dear wrote: “Robbert, the first time I saw your work, I immediately thought, ‘That’s it, that’s Los Angeles! “That’s exactly how I see this city. From the street, and at speed, it’s a punctual, inner experience, not continuous as in a movie. The city is perceived essentially as an interrupted sequence. In addition, your photographs convey the flatness of the city, the absence of verticality in Los Angeles, it’s un-dimensionality. Are these some of the effects you’re striving for in your work?”

Robbert Flick responded: “Yes, these are some of the core problems in representing Los Angeles visually…What has always struck me about the city is the possibility for the scan, a left-right/right-left movement. There is always the open sky. The horizon line here is perpetually present in any vision of Los Angeles, and I think that has a lot to do with the shaping of the perceptions, the notions of light and space. This kind of openness, combined with speed, was the starting point for me…I began to realize that my representation of Los Angeles was totally based on being in the driver’s seat.”

As you drive, at or above speed on the freeways of Los Angeles—depending on the time of day and traffic conditions of course—your gaze is constantly sought to glance outside the windows of your intimate capsule assimilating perceptual fragments of Los Angles as they rhymicaly ‘interrupt’ your concentration on the freeway movement. As an aspiring architect/designer/artist, how do you attempt to visualize your contribution to the context that is Los Angeles’ built environment/culture when perception of this city is often just a construction of interrupted flashes of spaces allowing you to see fragments of form/color/size/density/texture/light/darkness—all continually suspended between left and right glances? Is it possible to for you to create a sense of community within the larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles?

Robbert Flick, Sequential Views L A Diary, 1980s

Robbert Flick, Sequential Views L A Diary, 1980s
Robbert Flick, Sequential Views L A Diary, 1980s

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

31 Comments

31 thoughts on “Photographer Robbert Flick”

  1. I would contribute to the context of Los Angeles by showing what normally would be scene while walking around town instead of driving around it in a car, such as small moments like the clouds reflecting the city lights at night. I think it is completely possible to create a sense of community within the larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles by creating a community recreation meeting area merged with a community art gallery and information center. By having a community recreation center and an art gallery/information center right next to each other, there would be a space large enough for the forever curious people of Los Angeles. The rooftops could be repurposed as organic farms to supply the cafes within both buildings with food. There would also be free classes on how to sustainably create other gardens outward in the community because caring for others and bringing them food can really build strong connections. The art gallery/information center could provide resources that would otherwise be out of reach for the underfunded such as computers, books, audiobooks, movies, documentaries and video games to connect with the other people within the center so they can socially distance themselves. The recreation center would provide outdoor fields and sports equipment for teams to compete and learn the value of sportsmanship which can be taught to others within the community in which they live.

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  2. A lot of the way that people view Los Angeles, is through their car windows. The fast pace traffic blurs the surrounding landscape and your attention really shifts towards the blur of any vibrant color that interrupt the mostly grey/brown/green streaks of anything you pass by. Using Las Vegas as an example, car culture changed the architectural scene as the hotels and casinos needed to get the attention of the people who were driving and bring them into their casinos. This is where the neon signs and porte cochere’s were built in – the neon signs for casino advertisements and just seeing cars fill the porte cochere were an indicator for people that the casino was worth one stopping for because thats where everyone was.

    I think the visual representation of the architecture and landscape that people pass by in Los Angeles, has to be one that’s very eye catching. Do I think there needs to be more neon signs / billboards that obstruct view of the city sky? No. But the architecture should really needs standout from the horizon. This could possibly be done through using color that separates the building from the landscape and it can also be done by interrupting the horizon line with sporadic densities of buildings. You’ll be more enticed to look when there’s a change in the mundane landscape.

    I think the larger rhythm of Los Angeles itself creates a community – its not one thats necessarily good or bad – but a lot of people understand the rhythm of Los Angeles because of its freeway system. The routes are understood, the relief you get from taking exits and side streets, the busy traffic hours – people know those things. Theres a lot of shared experience that people have with the freeway systems

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  3. As an aspiring architect, it is our responsibility to understand and apply regional context that is present around such project. The photographer responds with mentioning “The horizon line here is perpetually present in any vision of Los Angeles, and I think that has a lot to do with the shaping of the perceptions, the notions of light and space.” Los Angeles has generated mass distribution of art and architecture, that it can be overwhelming at times to digest it all. The different contextual elements being presented, offer visual variety through the lens of fast paced encounters. It is possible to create a sense of community, but it will take some time to achieve such vision. It’s through a set of collaborations that can set forward a path to reclaim neighborhoods. An issue with the Los Angeles scene is the “interval” experiences described. Community can be defined as having a core, an experience that keeps guests entertained, or offers distinguished experiences within an area. A sense of community can be developed through the usage of public spaces, surrounded by mixed use residential. These passive encounters/commutes create the “core” elements for individuals.

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  4. As an artist, I feel like like a sense of community can be built within Los Angeles through art. I believe LA street artists have already and continue to build that community as they create their work. You can find it anywhere. Any empty wall on a building, a billboard, poles, brick walls, sidewalks, etc. is asking to be used as a canvas. The art you find throughout the city has the capability to captivate a viewer, even it its only for a couple of seconds. It slows down the sometimes chaotic energy that Los Angeles powers. It’s art meant for everyone who passes by, for the community. It’s not inside a gallery, where you might have to pay for admission just to see it. It’s a part of the architecture, a part of the city.

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  5. The city with endless suburbs that turn city limits into nothing more than drive by signage seems to flow well with Flick when he states, “there is always the open sky.” Thus, you would think Greater Los Angeles would be optimal for the creation of lasting experiences that can be felt and viewed outside of the lens of your windshield. As aspiring architects one of our obligations should always be to contextualize our sites and let them guide our designs instead of the other way around. Doing this would do wonders to creating a sense of community in a city of angels that thrives off its diversity. Therefore, I do believe this is possible, but it takes having the initiative to create spaces that spark your desire to pause your experience in a city that seemingly never slows down. In Los Angeles, this can be achieved through creating architecture that reflects its area, and buildings that are relevant to their surroundings, whether that is through scale or function. I think one of the problems you see in the Southland is that many buildings just do not seem to fit in and disengage people. However, you can also see glimpses of architecture that starts to do this throughout the city, whether it’s the cultural sectors with museums and promenades, or the hillsides that hold time stamped homes that brought people together through era’s. Thus, I believe architecture, if done responsibly can create a sense of community by creating a sense of place especially in a city as diverse as Los Angeles.

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  6. The described perceptual fragments of Los Angeles as a person gazes outside the window provides an opportunity to capture the attention of an individual for a few seconds through art or architecture. I find it interesting that Robbert Flick mentions, “The horizon line here is perpetually present in any vision of Los Angeles.” In the search to contribute to Los Angeles’s built environment as an aspiring architect, I would attempt to capture the attention by designing buildings that are regional to the culture distinguishing themselves to complement the horizon. Architecture that involves the community has a greater impact on the overall context as it can start to bring people together. Design is more successful when the voices of the community are acknowledged through your work. Also, emphasizing the importance of well-designed public spaces can lead to an increase in foot traffic within certain areas of the city causing the neighborhood to take pride in the space. Further, the maintenance of streets and sidewalks or the application of different materials produces more interesting streetscape attracting more eyes to gaze outside to the street reducing crime as the theory of Defensible space is applied. The process required to change the larger rhythm of Los Angeles is difficult but can be accomplished by redesigning the public urban fabric of the city.

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  7. As an aspiring artist, I visualize my contribution — to the context that LA’s environment and culture are perceived by principles of design — in sculptural terms. Robert Flick, as a photographer, views and captures the city in a two dimensional context. He emphasizes the flatness of the city, through two platforms. Through the window of a vehicle and the lens of his camera. I also think that Flick’s printing processes, such as the double exposure in Sequential Views LA Diary, provide a lot of depth in terms of movement. Flick is also able to capture the quality of the consistent light, from sunny and smoggy days, by limiting contrast in his photographs. The sky is always present in the photos as well, and is exposed in such a way that the time of day the image was taken loses importance, and perpetuates the idea that L.A. is always moving. As a sculptor, I see L.A. shaped by its architecture and environment in three dimensional terms. I find more of an appreciation in the forms of buildings, concrete, asphalt, vehicles, geography, and topography. If I were to create a body of work focused on L.A., or even in response to the work of Robert Flick, I think my work would contribute toward assembling a texture of Los Angeles, that is crowded with people, cars, unique architecture, and opportunity.

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  8. I visualize my attempted contribution to the context that is Los Angeles as a space or spaces created that foster interaction and a community mentality. New architecture that stands out aesthetically so that it can be noticed through the window of those passing by in their vehicles, while still being mindful of the natural aspects of Los Angeles. Architecture that provides people with activities to come together to do, such as a community garden or community art spaces so that artists can create art in the presence of others. This will facilitate conversations, bringing people of different backgrounds together so that they might create something entirely new and innovative as a community. Additionally, the larger rhythm of Los Angeles has brought people together. People identify with its unique pattern and flow, having taken part in and being brought together by its culture and design. These community spaces would only provide a stopping point for the local and visiting populations to join forces and further form a diverse community within Greater Los Angeles.

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  9. I found Robert Flick’s photos to be a fascinating and refreshing way to look at Las Angles. It also strangely makes sense, because almost everyone experiences their city through their car windows. It creates pieces of work that can be interpreted and relatable to all. Ever since we are children, we see most of our city, town, and community through our vehicles.
    This was a more challenging post to find the correct words because I am not an artist, design, or architecture student. Being an art history major with a pursuit in entertainment law, my contribution to a city or community won’t be one of my own creation. Although I can imagine helping protect the artists that will one day contribute to their cities, towns, and communities, I can’t physically imagine what it may appear as or express. That being said, if I had to pick an outlet that I would like to create some sculptures or paintings from, it would probably be from the sky. I think it would be cool to demonstrate how massive and intricate Las Angles is architecturally and culturally from a birds-eye view.

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  10. Robert Flick’s Sequential Views L A Diary perfectly capture the feeling of traveling through the city. As an aspiring artist, I would like to visit Los Angeles for a while before making a contribution, getting a feel for the city and forming my impression of it. Going along with this theme maybe I would make collaborative piece that is a, mural, sculpture, installation art. Installation art would be interesting to work on because the concept has to be a bit abstract but still convey an interpretation of Los Angeles. Installation art is also 3D and immersive, an experience. Yes, I think it is possible for me to create a sense of community within the larger rhythm of Los Angeles. Though I can’t do it without visiting the city for myself and get a feel for the community there.

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  11. Growing up in Los Angeles I always felt a sense of community due to the fact that I spent a lot of time attending family get togethers and parties on both birthdays and most holidays. As a photographer, If I had to capture this sense of community I would return to my extended family and attempt to come into these events as an outsider. However I believe that with my relation to them I would find it easiest to “infiltrate” this community without questioning. Aside from these I would also go to local parks, restaurants, outdoor swap meets and among other events or places where I feel I would be able to capture peoples’ authentic selves within their community. I guess what I’m getting at is, that I would definitely opt for the route of doing street photography; not setting up, no prior preparation, no expectations. I would simply get up and go, hoping that by the end, my results would parallel that unexpected and frivolous nature that is Los Angeles.

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  12. Los Angeles is a fast-pace city that is often viewed through a car window or quick sidewalk glances by those who reside there. However, I think this is an important concept to show in your work if you are trying to showcase the “true” Los Angeles. Rober Flick does a wonderful job at demonstrating how this could be done through his work, however I don’t think that the image of Los Angeles can only be captured through a car window. Los Angeles is a city that is built off of its eccentric and exciting community. By photographing the community and the people that built the foundation of Los Angeles, you would get a similar result to the message that Flick shows in his photographs.

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  13. I really enjoy Robbert Flick’s photos that capture movement and rapidly changing environments. As an artist, I think it would be interesting to rethink my physical relationship to the city. Instead of rapidly moving about the cityscape, what if I hunkered down and explored a single location, gesture, or object? I could use a macro lens to explore a small patch of city from an infinite number of perspectives. What would it look like if I then projected these images onto every surface in a room? Instead of the constantly changing perspectives of a city that one gets from driving on a highway, the viewer would be radically re-orientated, exploring the many ways that one can experience a single street corner, for example. Different light from different times of day, new shadows, blowing debris that passes by, a swirl of different colored cars shot in fast-motion. I think that this would provide an interesting contrast with the usual pace of the city and disrupt our ingrained ways of interacting with it.

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  14. As an aspiring architect my visual contribution towards Los Angeles built environment would be to compliment the shaping perceptions, light, and space of the city. How I plan on complimenting these key features to Los Angeles culture, I would start by implement sculptures and art installations in plazas, squares, and promenades. When driving around Los Angeles you continuously have the possibility of scan from left to right, right to left, the horizon line, and the open skies. With the installation of art and sculptures incorporated within the urban fabric, the driver would have fragments of Los Angeles culture and will have rhythmically interruptions of art during their commute on the freeway. These colorful art installations all over the city would shape the perception of Los Angeles by portraying light, casting shadows, creating new textures, and offer a variation of size and density to its horizon line. For the driver they will constantly have left and right fragments or glances, creating a sense of community, rhythm, and neighborhood vibe to the enormous city of Los Angeles.

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  15. Maria Dos Santos
    ART 699
    Week 5 Post

    The perception of Los Angeles is “often just a construction of interrupted flashes of space allowing you to see fragments of form/color/size/density/texture/light/darkness—all continually suspended between left and right glances.” This statement accurately relates to most of my recent Los Angeles trips. Additionally, I agree with Robbert Flick’s statement, “There is always the open sky. The horizon line here is perpetually present in any vision of Los Angeles, and I think that has a lot to do with the shaping of the perceptions, the notions of light and space. This kind of openness, combined with speed, was the starting point for me…I began to realize that my representation of Los Angeles was totally based on being in the driver’s seat.” Through my personal experience in Los Angeles, my perspective is also usually based on being in the driver’s seat. I imagine that a lot of other people who get to experience Los Angeles have similar feelings on this topic as well. This type of experience is very unique to Los Angeles

    As an inspiring architect, I attempt to visualize my contribution to the context that is Los Angeles’ built environment and culture in a way that is personal and respectful to the unique architecture we experience in Los Angeles. The city is authentic and full of culture. The architecture in Los Angeles deserves to reflect this. I believe that it is possible to create a sense of community within the “larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles.” I feel like Los Angeles already has a sense of community, but beyond that, there are many other micro-communities that make up Los Angeles and these communities also have individual senses of community amongst themselves.

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  16. The interesting thing about L.A. is that there is really no one thing that makes the city what it is. It is a melting pot of different people and experiences. When driving through L.A., I am always noticing how 20 minutes or even 10 minutes later, I am seeing a completely different landscape. One moment you are in this pristine, corporate-filled district, and the next you are surrounded by mom & pop shops, the ocean, theme parks, whatever! There is not one community but many communities, but overall people can come together as one to say that the wildly diverse population IS the community. So yes, as an artist, an aspiring writer, and someone who is interested in certain aesthetics, I can become a part of this diverse community by contributing my piece of variance. I attempt to visualize by experiencing the little areas of L.A. that speak to me personally. These aspects, such as the dog beaches that my family frequent, the Asian markets that help us stay connected to our people from afar, the theme parks that remind of me of my favorite movies, etc help me to build themes and characters in my art. There is that aspect of flashes of interruptions, however, there are many like myself who thrive on this and can build a community on this. For instance, even though I am in Las Vegas, I stay connected to the “retro-loving” community in L.A., which is dispersed all over the city but can come together to collaborate for certain events, ideas, etc. The larger rhythm of L.A. is built on the flashes of interruption, not vice versa if that makes sense. So as an artist, to become a part of a community, one just needs to take the initiative to proclaim that what they are contributing is purposeful and of this city. Mid-century buildings are L.A., Chateau Marmont is L.A., Grauman’s Chinese theater is L.A., The Getty is L.A., The Hollywood sign is L.A., Randy’s Donuts is L.A., LAX is L.A., and so forth. All of these are very different structures yet we accept the unique stylized architecture of each place as L.A. Hence, I or any artist can find a place for our art if we please.

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  17. I like Robbert Flick’s photography a lot. Among the three photos shown I think each shows a unique aspect of Los Angeles, from the often crowded roads to the more open areas and even the deep blue sky. When most people think of Los Angeles I would imagine they think of a sprawling city, but of course in reality that is only a fraction of what Los Angeles has to offer and I think these photos are able to illustrate that very well. I do think that it would be possible to “create a sense of community within the larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles” by focusing on what makes that rhythm flow. I would imagine that by making something that embodies the feel of Los Angeles, what exactly that is might differ from person to person but it believe it is a sense of belonging and opportunity even in the face of such a large famous location.

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  18. As an aspiring Architect, I believe that a contribution to the built environment that is Los Angeles will bring forth more significance for people. Those contributions can be achieved by relating something to the current culture and issues within the city. Designing something that most individuals can relate to and attract. There is also another way of creating a visual significance through the flashes, those can be the creation of something monumental, a symbol which grabs attention to the object or such a building with unique ornaments. It can be the incorporation of something grand and flashy that it captures an individual’s attention and focuses in the overly abstract and outrages characteristic of the design. Another can be an incorporation of issues, importance of the current culture and environment, and extruding ideas onto the design to have a kin attachment to something with significance. Those ideas can be supplemented by attention to form, color, size, density, texture, light, and darkness.
    There is always a hope that you can create a sense of community within a larger rhythm especially in the case of Los Angeles. People love attraction and as people congregate there is a sense of community. A community is a group of individuals who share a common bond. Even though the largest rhythm, a community of people bonded by common beliefs can create something powerful and significant. Such as Las Vegas, may seem micro compared to Los Angeles but when you think about it, Las Vegas is composed of many communities that make up the whole city. There are communities from the suburbs of Summerlin, Henderson, North Las Vegas, Aliante, Centennial, Green Valley, and much more that influence the culture and environment of the city.

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  19. As an aspiring artist, I would attempt to visualize my contribution to the context of Los Angeles by challenging the “interrupted flashes.” I would slow down and focus on specific moments within communities, or on physical places/objects. Robbert Flick’s photography captures a lot of individual moments and synthesizes them into something bigger. In my work I am interested in isolating moments and diving into them further. While this is my personal approach, and a way to challenge the typical rhythm of Los Angeles, I do think that the approach of Robbert Flick and others is a valid way of representing “community.” The idea of a series of “left and right glances,” that encompass the scale and diversity of a city of Los Angeles may seem like it is too broad a scope to support a sense of community, but I think it does in its own way. Like the freeway that runs throughout the city like a vascular system, our understanding of the city as a whole unit with parts moving together symbiotically is essential to understanding the smaller communities within.

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  20. I think I would choose to represent a view of Los Angeles as seen from areas that you would go to to intentionally leave the car and walk around. For example, a park, a shopping mall, or a walkable neighborhood. These are the places that the community really interact with each other and they are the places that can be absorbed to the full via all the senses. Perhaps I would choose to place this somehow alongside a representation of the more muted feeling of being in a car to contrast the two forms of experience.

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  21. I like to take pictures and capture all spaces through the lens of my camera. I would love to be as efficient at expressing my world through drawing and design as I am with photography, but I am not quite there yet! So, I would create a series of photographs to capture the community within LA. I like to use power lines, plants, buildings/structures, and natural lighting to capture the essence of any space. The sense of community in LA comes from the atmosphere that has been created by people over the years. The plants that have been adopted to the area, the style of buildings/homes, the way the light catches in the humid air and throws yellow rays over green rolling hills. Los Angeles is meant to have its pictures taken out of the sun roof of a car on the freeway as the sun sets. Another setting I would like to explore in LA would be the suburbs, away from the action and in a more familiar space that can be just as beautiful. Parks are a very personal space to a community that tourists won’t flood, but maybe a family down the street will be enjoying, and that is a setting that I can connect with and create community within no matter where I am.

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  22. The beauty of Los Angeles is how everyone interprets their view and what they choose to see from the variety of things the city has to offer. Los Angeles creates the community by having art surrounding the city from murals,fine architecture, and other public art. People stop and admire them , create a conversation, and created a selfie culture with these works to share on social media with their family and friends and express, “I was here!”. Having art the center point of Los Angeles makes everyone share memories of a specific spot and want to share it with other to have a familiar experience.

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  23. It reminds me of how McDonalds did seed bombing in Las Angeles on the side of the freeway with yellow poppy seeds. This created a permanent advertisement with their yellow big letter M, these could not be removed for the fact that this specific poppy plant is a protected species in California and illegal to remove. I think that seed bombing with colorful plants, planting wild crocus, saffron, bulb plants, and naturalizing plants can help with the visual stimulation to add to the life of the city and color. I am a firm believer of diversity of plant culture to help create a more visual break to the overwhelming architecture and a way to pay tribute to the stolen land that we build on and kill the wildlife around us. This is one way to create relief in an organic and healthy way to the city that also helps with nature. These can be done in patterns for reoccurring patterns each year without maintenance

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  24. Los Angeles is a city of many different sights. Capturing the beauty in its true form is definitely not easy. As a photographer myself, I always find myself getting lost in all the little quirks LA has. For example, I specialize in editorial and fashion photography, I always get distracted by how certain alley ways or certain buildings look. Stuff that to the normal person, wouldn’t be given a second glance. It has a certain distinction that cannot be explained and can in America, could only be compared to New York City. In LA, there is always something to see. The giant city makes it hard for one community to come together, so it has thousands of different communities. The one thing they all have in common is that their home is Los Angeles, which beyond physically is a spiritual connection which they carry a deep loyalty to.

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  25. I think it is very possible to create a sense of community in a city like Los Angeles. As fast paced as the city is, there are times that people do have some time to slow down and get together. In a city like LA, where one is always on the road, having a designated area or space to would be important to bring people together. Having parks and recreational areas that match the area and neighborhood would be important. Maybe having a drive-by gallery where there are sculptures would be a good idea if that makes sense.

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  26. Street art embodies the street as a symbol of symbolism with a particular social meaning and spatializes it as a public space. This way, a sense of community can be built in Los Angeles through street art.
    In the intellectual sense, beyond a narrow art-loving audience, the streets are suitable places to present exhibitions to large masses, create visual materials, and develop the public awareness of art and culture of an art object created for the public to spread this awareness. Aiming to draw attention to the region where the event occurs and contribute to cultural tourism, street art exhibitions aim to reach a broad audience and compare a comprehensive cultural event with society.
    These encounters are essential experiences in evaluating today’s art and observing the relations that society can establish with art productions. The public space activities, which enable cultural and artistic events that reach a limited number of viewers to meet with a much wider audience, carry a multi-color and interdisciplinary richness with murals and graffiti works.
    The messages conveyed by public art objects are different. They have essential meanings related to their place and time. They are the city’s reference points, represent the texture, history, memory, memory, and culture of the city, integrate with that city, and become a part of the city. For this reason, it is not enough to see public art objects as art history objects isolated from their surroundings. It is necessary to consider them as the continuation and focal point of the architectural space they belong to within all social, historical, political, and social relations.
    Rejecting the city’s standardized layout, marginal street art is an element of Los Angeles’ unmapped dimensions. Therefore, narrative styles should be developed with architectural, environmental, and social contexts. Street art’s attempt to transform the “planned and organized” city into a “home,” to show identity in the public space and to redesign the public space means that the town, sterilized through architecture, communicated with the public only this time by disrupting and transforming it through architecture.

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  27. As an aspiring artist, I would have to visit the Los Angeles area and do more research before deciding how I would attempt to contribute to the environment/culture. I would need to spend some time in the area and learning about the community and surroundings before I can decide what art would be best to contribute. I think it is possible to create a sense of community within the larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles. There is so much diversity within the Los Angeles community that art works or even architecture could bring people together and gain their attraction. This sense of community can be created by developing a recreational area with large art works and nature where many viewers can gather, relax, and admire their community. Los Angeles is a beautiful fast paced city but can be brought together by parks and galleries celebrating history and art bringing together their diverse community.

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  28. When most people see Los Angeles, it is through the lens of media, be it news or a movie or a show. The people who live in Los Angeles see LA through memories they share and people they’ve interacted with. If I was to contribute in an artistic way, I would like to focus on the everyday. Like, the cultures within different parts of LA, the routes people go to work. Focus on what makes LA…the people within its boundaries. I think it would work best if such artist lived in LA and went through the experiences, not just from a distances or in a car.

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  29. As a designer, I would attempt to visualize my contribution to Los Angeles through perhaps creating an outside gallery or spot for people to gather. That is how you can create a sense of community within the larger rhythm. Everyone has their own experiences and culture. If you give people a place to hang out and enjoy life apart from their day to day lives, it is amazing how a community can form. Even a gallery of different art forms can inspire people and raise curiosity of the world itself.

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  30. For me as an artist I attempt to visualize L.A as an eclectic giant. I as I have said before am not a regular visitor of Los Angeles but during the time I spent there I noticed that there was a little bit of everything to be experienced in terms of the people. As an artist I try to keep my non-commissioned work within the realms of what I find to be important to me. I view art as personal. Even if the work is a statement by the artists about society or what have you, it at heart is important to that individual artist. So I see L.A as realm where one may find a potential likeminded audience given the sheer diversity of its people. In essence I feel that any contribution I made towards art in L.A would be in recognition of the sub cultures in which I have a passion for that live out there. I’m not interested in trying to capture the city for I see the city as a polarized entity and as such I don not feel that Los Angeles has anything that can be seen as quintessential L.A other than it traffic but that has already been recognized by other artists and as such I feel that I would be riding on the coattails of others if I tried to contribute to a visual perception of what L.A is.

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  31. As an aspiring artist/graphic designer, I would like to visualize the environment/culture of Los Angeles as a gigantic city full of life and advanced architecture. I was actually born and raised in Los Angeles. My family and I have lived there for years before moving to Las Vegas, and even after moving away, we still like to visit LA. Because of all that, I am already somewhat familiar with Los Angeles, and I like to compare and contrast LA with Las Vegas. I would consider LA to be more lush and greener than LV, as well as more humid, which is expected since LV is a desert and LA is more of a “tropical” climate. However, even knowing this, I still feel like I need to know more about LA in order to visualize it better. After learning about LA some more through ART 434, I feel like I have a better understanding of it now. Specifically, I now see LA as more than just a tropical or beach climate; LA is a huge city full of advanced technology and architecture and is also brimming with innovation, as I have learned from the textbook Los Angeles Architecture: The Contemporary Condition by James Steele. It also seems like it’s always busy, with its insanely high traffic and the people’s heavy reliance on automobiles. I believe that seeing the city in fragments of light and space, like one can see while in the seat of a moving car, also helps one’s perception of the city; it shows how big and open LA really is. I would like to encompass all of that in my art–that LA is a very lively city full of advanced buildings, leafy greens, beaches, and oceans (since California borders the Pacific Ocean). I believe that I can create a sense of community within the larger rhythm that powers Los Angeles by showing the “life” in the city, that is, by showing the large abundance of people and cars that make up the population of the city and showing how incredibly busy the city seems to be with things like high traffic. I believe that these are all ways that Los Angeles can be truly and faithfully represented.

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