“…a single image would encapsulate the promises, hopes, and dreams of Los Angeles’ future…”

Look forward in time. You are a licensed architect, an artist, or a practicing designer and you are driven to fix into visible form an image you have created that you wish to become iconic! Now imagine you are driving through the hills of Los Angeles and you find yourself on the 1600 block of Woods Drive. Motoring up Woods Drive you notice a residence on your left side but it doesn’t grab your attention. Looking past the shrubs, Palm Trees, and retaining wall, the geometric form is exceedingly simple with no external features to cause you to pause and sustain a long glance over your left shoulder. You have no inclination to stop your car and stare at this residence. Your eyes notice the street number of this house and you realize you are not only at your destination but you are looking at one of the most famous residences, not just in Los Angeles, but in the entire Western World!

All you see at this moment, however, is the street side exposure of the famous Case Study House #22—Pierre Koenig’s masterpiece—the Stahl House! You begin to wonder how did this very non-distinct form, seen from the street, become as famous, maybe even more famous, than Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater? You find a place to pull over and park your car. Getting out the driver’s door, you walk over to the other side of Woods Drive and get bits and pieces of the Greater Los Angeles valley as they become more and more visible as you find open spaces for your eyes to perceive through. But you possess a much sought after invitation to tour the Stahl House, so you confidently walk through the carport and step into the inner courtyard space containing the swimming pool. Very quickly your eyes see what famed Southern California architecture photographer Julius Shulman perceived that balmy evening on Monday, May 9, 1960! Julius Shulman’s artist eyes captured “a single image that would encapsulate the promises, hopes, and dreams of Los Angeles’ future…!” (Mary Melton, A Shot in the Dark: The Unknown Story Behind L.A.’s Most Celebrated Photograph, December 5, 2016).

Is this pictorial moment something you are striving for professionally or, is such an iconic experience too remote an opportunity to waste your time and energy on with everything else you are dealing with in your life?

Stahl House, Street View
Stahl House, Street View
Julius Shulman, THE ICONIC PHOTOGRAPH of the Stahl House, May 9, 1960

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

34 Comments

34 thoughts on ““…a single image would encapsulate the promises, hopes, and dreams of Los Angeles’ future…””

  1. The Stahl House and Fallingwater both became iconic as a result of their innovative designs by implementing architectural strategies demonstrating the genius behind the architects. In the same manner, I aspired to construct spaces that reflect my ideals reinforcing the belief that architecture should serve to promote a healthier lifestyle through the connection of nature and vernacular design. Iconic structures achieve the level of praise and accomplishment by proposing their unique concepts that produce an authentic experience. Architects usually strive to meet the project’s goals and surpass the client’s expectations with the notion of illustrating their ideas. Similarly, I do not strive in my professional career to become an architect that seeks the same level of fame as the Stahl house. However, if one of my projects does become globally recognized I would not shy away from the opportunity to contribute to the architecture world by inspiring others through my work. Time and energy should not be considered a waste of time if the accomplishments from an iconic work lead you to improve as a professional architect.

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  2. I think as aspiring architects a pictorial moment would be a great accomplishment from a project, however I don’t think it is the main goal from design. As designers I believe one of our goals should be to create spaces that have the potential to influence these types of emotions through well thought out work . This is done by creating spaces that exude efficient shelter, relatability and comfort, and new experiences that transpire from our built forms. Pierre Koenig’s intention with the Stahl House was to create an experience that was relatable to it’s dwellers, but created a new experience unique to its location. You see this in how its anchored, how it meets the ground, and how it frames the city views. It ended up becoming a picturesque experience, but its architectural qualities and relation to the site are what made it an awesome experience. Every project we take on as designers should be seen as an opportunity to create work that resonates with its people, it’s location, and it’s culture. Design that springs up from its community, lives with its community and integrates the community will be able to create similar pictorial moments as the Stahl House, which became an emblem of Greater Los Angeles.

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  3. There are many great architects whom have attained this level of success. I do not think these architects have sought out the publicity or attention, but have stimulated a conversation. Their passion for the profession has been embodied in each of these iconic projects, thus bringing the spotlight onto them and their firms. Architectural firms such as Zaha Hadid Architects, BIG and Foster + Partners have amassed such portfolios, that have been proven to be successful. In each of these firms, there is a process and distinct style in which programs and forms are developed. The Stahl House remains an iconic piece of architecture, as it advanced the idea of modernity and simplicity. Simple to form, the home is able to carry the essence of Los Angeles. These “moments” are not planned for, but rather are formed as a compliment to the project. Proper site analysis and contextual background can formulate a strong concept. Though the project is simple in its form, it is bold in highlighting the features of the city. The pictorial taken in 1960 is evidently reminiscent, as the project does a job well done at transcending the viewer. Through the lens of the photographer, the clean lines and transparency of the project is present. As an aspiring architect, I think it is motivating when we see projects such at the Stahl house. It pushes us to determine function and form, and how one relates to another. A pictorial moment is significant, as it realizes the main idea. Architectural design has long been known to make a statement. Frank Gehry’s Bilbao Museum set off an international hype to achieve such an iconic building. Los Angeles has attained a piece of art by also constructing the Walt Disney Concert Hall. These were forms of deconstruction architecture that have made bold statements in the architectural context.

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  4. Maria Dos Santos
    Week 9 Reading Response

    The Stahl House has always been one of my favorite Case Study houses. Although I have never had the pleasure of visiting it, I appreciate its simplicity and beauty of it. Looking forward in time when I am a licensed architect, I don’t believe that this pictorial moment is something I am striving for professionally. I have other personal goals of using architecture to be able to help underprivileged people. I am not necessarily seeking opportunities to create buildings that are iconic, but rather architecture that has an impact on the people that need it the most, who are often forgotten.
    I don’t believe that this iconic experience is too remote of an opportunity to waste my time and energy. If this is what certain architects want to get out of architecture, I find it exciting and inspiring. I just can’t say this is something I look forward to because I am not really concerned with praise. I believe there are other things I would rather focus my attention on.

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  5. As an artist, I’ve come to learn that the outcomes I desire most with my work is a conversation. I’d like for people to view it in their own way, and see how it resonates with them as an individual. My work is often very personal, so I’m often interested in seeing if the tone is conveyed to the viewer. As of right now, I don’t find myself striving for this pictorial and iconic moment when it comes to my work. But, I don’t think aiming for such a feat is a waste of ones time. I think maybe because architecture is such a physical addition to society, perhaps architects might desire more of a pictorial moment. Our world is filled with so many distractions, so for people to stop an take notice on your structure it must mean something to an architect. Who knows? Maybe sometime in my future I’ll desire for my work to have that sort of effect on people.

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  6. The Stahl House-Pierre Koenig’s iconic masterpiece did not have the intent of becoming the icon and having fame, the main goal was to create meaningful experiences for individuals interacting with the space. The house sits on the edge of the Los Angeles cliffs that frames the views of the city, creates openness and a seamless indoor-outdoor experience. The main point of this house was not the strive of fame but the response to place in which individuals will have memorable and an unforgettable experience when at the house. The house overtime became an icon because of its beauty and experiential attributes. The recognition from the people who appreciates the architecture, design intent and emotional impact have lead to its fame, Koenig only aspired to create a space that accommodate the people and provide them with experiences with space that embeds a great impact.
    As an aspiring architect I do not want to strive for fame, I want to strive on creating a positive impact on people. I do not want to hinder myself on just one focus, I have dreams for helping people within architecture and outside of architecture. If fame and the strive to be an icon are what other architects aspire to spend their time and energy, then that is to be respected and not seen as a waste of time and energy. As for myself, I believe I can create more impact if I have ventures and perspectives outside the realm of architecture. I do want my license to be an architect one day, and I want to use that to create spaces that have meaningful experiences, a better life and wellbeing and a way help people become better versions of themselves. However, if my architectural work is recognized then I would jump in the opportunity to inspire the people.

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  7. I think in some way it is a pictorial moment that people strive for when creating these architectural works. However, its not the most important thing that we think about doing as architects. Of course there are more factors that play into the entire design – how do we connect to the environment, how do we bring people to these spaces, what are they supposed to feel when they enter/leave the space, and so on. We dont create these architectural works solely for the purpose of having people photograph them for exposure or for credential purposes but we want to create these moments that make people want to remember these spaces and how they felt in them at that moment.

    I think Shulman’s iconic photograph of the Stahl house is so iconic because it frames a scene of the project that in a way captures the essence of the project itself – looking at its design and structural form – but it also shows us how people use the space and how the space connects to the landscape, the site, and the city. With those beginning pictures, from the street, you dont assume much from the house. It’s not exactly the most eye catching house if we think about how we think of these eye catching exteriors. But the beauty of the space really comes out when you look at Shulman’s iconic photograph. We see a space for these people gathering, this modern living area overlooking the city lights and thats really what the space is.

    Kinda closing my thoughts, Its the pictorial moments but more so in a way that we can frame the essence of the project and the emotional / human experiences we can create in the space. So these moments within the space that we design is what matters the most and from there – as others have said – how can conversations be generated about the architecture (and art that we create). Personally, I’d care more about what people have to say about these pictorial moments – or just the emotional experience / conceptual ideas captured in these pictorial moments – than having those photographs be shared to millions of people

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  8. As creators, we are all trying to connect. To connect with the most people possible is to create an iconic moment. So, if you are not striving for that iconic moment, then what are you striving for? You can say you are striving for something more simplistic or maybe something that does not need to gain a lot of recognition to register as successful. But then, why are you creating if not to be recognized? If you never strive for the greatest then you sure as hell won’t get it. I don’t mean to rant ! But I just truly believe that creating something as iconic as this image isn’t out of anybody’s reach ! If you think there’s too much happening in your life and and that you can’t make the time to create architecture/art/design that is impactful, then you won’t. You know, you have to make the conscious choice to invest the time + energy into something for it to form. I think that it is important for creators to let their individual style just ooze out of them and coat everything that they do and that is when the iconic picture will come.

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  9. While I wouldn’t say this specific moment is something I strive for professionally, I don’t think that moments like these should be undermined. Everyone has a designer, artist, or architect that they admire and wish to experience their work in person. I am not an architect or designer so this specific moment does not align with my career goals and what I am to achieve in my professional career, however that does not mean I would pass up the opportunity to meet someone who has created a substantial difference in the world of art, even if it does not specifically apply to my concentration. All art should be appreciated and experienced and opportunities such as that one should not be passed up.

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  10. I think to achieve a pictorial experience that is deemed iconic would be an ultimate accomplishment. But, I think that by aiming for that in particular it is possible you will not get it. I think if I were an architect I would keep this in my mind as a source of inspiration but not dwell to much on the idea of attaining it. The reason is because I personally have a tendency to overthink and for me this stunts creativity.

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  11. A “pictorial moment” is a hard thing to predict, and often comes from the photographer/moment, more so than the building itself. You can attempt to create something with the potential to become iconic but you can’t control whether it will have the desired impact or not. Professional architects and artists of any kind have to be content with the uncertainty of whether or not people will even like their work, let alone if it will generate an iconic cultural moment. It’s hard not to think about the potential glory that you might attain from putting your work out into the world, but I think it’s important to remain dedicated to the process regardless. The case study houses were never intended to draw attention to the individual architects, but to create a sustainable and cohesive program. The Stahl house obviously resonated with the cultural climate of Los Angeles at the time it was built, and the photograph by Shulman encapsulated the moment beautifully. The stars aligned for this particular house and architect, but I don’t think that it’s necessarily in the cards for everyone.

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  12. I don’t think that the pictorial moment is something that I am striving for because I think such a thing should come as organically as it can be. That is not to say that any other artist can’t achieve and that it is not worth a try. When Julius Schulman captured the Stahl house, I don’t think he realized the impact that his image would cause. When I saw the first picture of the Stahl house exterior, I thought that it was a warehouse or a portable. Throughout this course, I’ve learned to look a little deeper at these works and truly understand the meaning and process behind them. After looking at the interior and the view from the Stahl house into the city, I though about how wonderful of a work the Stahl house is and the technology used to have it hang over the city. Although the shape of the house is rather geometric, I think it meshes perfectly with the mountain.

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  13. I really like the idea behind the case study homes, something affordable and quick but a piece of art in itself. I think maybe something like the case study homes may come back here in the next year or two. Once the economy fully opens and has to crash due to shutdowns and lay-offs, some people will be looking for alternative options. I am a little confused by the wording of the question. My understanding is, would you skip the opportunity to visit the Stahi house for a professional meeting? My answer would be yes, the home has been there since the 1960’s so when I have the time, I would go back and explore the house and its materials. I would want to see how the architects designed the new materials to look like a home that costs more than it did. They made a piece of artwork that was livable and economical for the soldiers to raise their families. And that, in my opinion, is some architecture that deserves time to be admired.

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  14. Ideally, the pictorial moment is something to strive for in everything you create. Though this is not very realistic because of responsibilities and time constraints most people must work with. Also, if I were to expect to create something with the expectation of it might becoming iconic but it doesn’t, all the effort and time put into would feel like a waste. I would just be setting myself up for a lot of disappointment. So professionally I want to make things I can be proud of and get income from it, that would be good enough for me. It would be great if one of the things I made becomes iconic but it’s not something I long for. Maybe it’s just me not being very ambitious, but I feel like that pictorial moment is something incredibly rare and there must be the “perfect storm” for things to really take off.

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  15. Picturing myself motoring up the meandering Hollywood hills leading up to the 1600 Woods Drive and randomly finding myself in front of the famous Case Study #22 Stahl House, my jaw would be on the ground and my hand would be extended outward pointing at the architectural masterpiece! I would begin to wonder how this simple geometric form with no external features seen from the street became so iconic and a staple for modern architecture. My curiosity would lead me to pull over and to park my car to explore and find out more about this modern masterpiece. In my findings I spot a perspective that overlooks the Hollywood hills and opens to the Los Angeles valley. It’s within this moment, I realize it’s not the street presence that made the Stahl House famous, but it’s how the building overlooks the Los Angeles valley and how the L-shape dramatically overhangs from the slope. I would be tempted to take a tour of the Stahl house and see the famous interior courtyard of the pool overlooking the valley. Once, inside the interior courtyard and getting a glimpse of the famous picture photographed by Julius Shulman of the pool, the panoramic view of the valley, and the intensity of the building extending past the slope, I would than truly understand how this building became the most famous residence in the western world. However, I still believe that Falling Water by the remarkable architect Frank Lloyd Wright is still the most famous residences in the world.

    Julius Shulman’s photograph captured what he says is “a single image that would encapsulate the promises, hopes, and dreams of Los Angeles’ future…!” What Julius Shulman captured that day with his camera, is what most professionals strive for in their career, to have a breakthrough in their work that gives them endless opportunities and opens many doors. Shulman’s single image in the dark created an iconic experience in his career that was legendary and made his work immortal. This pictorial moment is something I’m striving for in my future career as an aspiring architect because I want my designs to open endless opportunities for me, to create an iconic experience, and for my hard work to be remembered, and immortal!

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  16. Art and architecture such as the Stahl House are undeniably iconic. It encapsulated something beyond a view or a building, something that is breathtaking and innovative. While creating something iconic is a remote experience that one may strive for, I don’t believe that it would necessarily be within my control. My goals are not oriented around creating something iconic for the purpose of it being noteworthy. My professional goals are instead to work on what I am passionate about and create while holding that space. If I work and create from an inspired space, it may never become noteworthy, or maybe it will become known and iconic. I don’t believe that it is predictable or realistic, for myself at least, to do something for the sole purpose of catching and holding a population’s attention. I will be happy if what I do has meaning and significance to me, and if that reaches or impacts even one person I would be grateful that my work, creative or otherwise, spoke to that person.

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  17. When art is recognized to the capacity that Pierre Koenig’s has achieved, it’s beautiful. I believe that some artists would love to achieve this level of recognition and have their pictorial moment and some may even aspire solely for such a moment. Some artists do not have any interest in this whatsoever or could care less either way. For myself, as a writer, if I were ever to write a piece that was ever met with such high regard, I would feel blessed, would like to think that I would not take it for granted, however I write for myself and it’s not an aspiration in my professional career. When I was younger I used to be a professional Okinawan Eisa dance (traditional Okinawan drumming with dancing basically) choreographer and we performed at big events like the NFL Pro Bowl Party. During those times, I aspired to see my choreography recognized by our famous Okinawan mentors. I also of course hoped that whoever was watching our team perform, no matter whether or not they were familiar with our culture, would feel moved when they saw the passion in our performances and in my choreography. But even with the pressure of professional performance, I always performed for myself first. I think that the pictorial moment is sought after but not a requirement. Personally, I love to experience the world with an open heart and try to avoid the burn out of overachievement. I feel like true recognition comes from hard work but also organically without the pressure of wanting greatness. I would love to stop and take a pictorial moment in front of the Koenig’s home. Life is busy but there is worth in stopping to appreciate someone else’s mastery and having a moment of reflection. 

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  18. As a visual artist, one could argue that everything I do is aiming for a pictorial moment. This isn’t, of course, an easy thing to achieve. What is a pictorial moment anyway, as it would relate to visual art? In my case, working mostly within the medium of video art, it is a moment for the viewer when everything clicks into place; a moment of clarity, both striking visually and illuminating of the conceptual concerns behind the image. If it’s difficult to achieve such a moment, it’s equally hard to know as an artist when you have done so. Intention does not equal effect! I’ve found that the only way I know that I’m close to reaching it is when I show my work to other people. Watching their reactions and hearing about their experiences with my work helps me fine-tune and pinpoint successful techniques that I can bring forward into my next project. It’s my philosophy that an artist must react to their audience the same way an audience will react to their work.

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  19. Although I like it conceptually, creating a pictorial moment, I don’t believe that would be something I would strive for professionally. Don’t get me wrong, it would be amazing to have my work recognized in that way. To create something that stunning, that iconic. However I feel like the pressure of actively trying to create a pictorial moment, would simply stop me from creating. I’ve always been a bit of a perfectionist. I’ve spent many years getting better at accepting that finished, in many cases, is better than perfect. However, for a pictorial moment, everything would have to be perfect. It feels like even things out of my control would have to be perfect. The stars all must be aligned. I try to strive for my work to be cohesive and visually pleasing. To strive for a pictorial moment would cause me to almost certainly burnout. It’s something I’d much rather stumble into than actively chase after, but it’s not something you could stumble into now is it.

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  20. I think in some way, I do aspire to have a pictorial moment such as this. However, I think the most potent part of Pierre Koenig’s work is that is is a surprise. The view from the street does not at all reveal the true potential and astonishing beauty of the work. I think this surprising aspect can definitely be achieved visually and aesthetically, but I find it even more compelling when the conceptual quality of the work is as equally surprising. I do also agree though, that such an iconic experience would require the full commitment of my life to my practice and craft. This is a sacrifice I am willing to make for creative success, but I also believe that this can not be forced. The idea must come at the right time, and until it does, you must keep creating. It is sort of like a cathartic experience of getting all the bad art out first, and then you start progressing and making really great work.

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  21. Personally, this very specific instance isn’t a moment I would strive for, mostly due to my not being an architect. However, I do believe that every artist of every type strives for a moment where they would have the opportunity to meet a person who made an impact on the world of art. I don’t think aiming for such a thing could possibly be a waste of time. Every artist, no matter what kind of artist a person is, waits for a moment for people to stop and take a moment to admire or appreciate the work that they’ve created.

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  22. Personally, this pictorial moment is not something I strive for professionally at this time. I do believe all types of artist hope or strive for this opportunity to achieve such a moment, but do not believe it is the main goal because it is such a difficult moment to strive for. Also, I do not think it is a waste of time and energy at all. Everyone has different goals and desires, and there are some artists who probably feel that this pictorial or iconic moment is vital for their professional careers.

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  23. Having a pictorial is desired for all kinds of artist. This idea exists more in Architecture because wanting people to visit this space and have a their own magical experience. I don’t think it is necessary to have photograph that shines brighter that what you see in person. It becomes two different pieces which is great if it is on purpose. It becomes the photographers piece and then there is the architecture its self. But most of the time it doesn’t work that way.

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  24. While I do find myself with a busy life, I do not think that striving for a pictorial moment as an artist is meaningless or useless. However, I do have my fair share of thoughts on the idea of achieving a pictorial moment like the following: although it is important for me and I hope to find a pictorial moment at some point within my art career, it is not my entire focus when creating art. Why? Because knowing myself I will become obsessed with the idea of finding that perfect moment, or the “decisive moment” as coined by Henri Cartier-Bresson within the world of photography. And I will forget about enjoying the creation of my work and push myself to force a pictorial moment, which would not feel genuine in my opinion. Leaving me with less and less passion for my main craft, which in this case is photography. I also do not think it would be up to me to decide what is and is not a pictorial moment, because I think it can have different meanings to different people. So overall, I do want to find this pictorial moment in my work and share it with the world, but I will let it come along to me naturally, without purposely thinking about it.

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  25. I do tend to actually strive for such a moment in my career but I have a feeling something like Case Study House #22 will never happen in it. However, setting your sights on creating something of that level is good for ambition and dreams. I believe that even if you know that you’ll never achieve something on a certain level, it drives your work to become great. I do not believe that having such high hopes will deteriorate your work nor is it a waste of time, and shouldn’t be too remote for anyone. Pictorial moments, Magnum Opus and masterpieces all take time whether it takes place in one consistent timeline or worked on throughout your lifetime.

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  26. I would say the experience of witnessing such a sight is something anyone would strive for. We would all like to enjoy the finer things in life, and yet the responsibilities we shoulder often prevent us from doing so. I personally enjoy seeing anything that might inspire me artistically, but my opportunities to do so are few and far between because of my other obligations. However I also think it is important to make time for enriching experiences as without them life will seem bland and the desire to create will be nonexistent.

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  27. Arron Adams
    Art 473-1001
    An iconic experience like this is, in my opinion, the sort of thing that cannot really be striven for, it must occur naturally, organically, and I would even go so far as to say that trying to achieve something like it, trying to push for it to happen, would somewhat lessen the resulting experience. Just doing the best one can, keeping one’s eyes open, and letting something like this happen on its own, would make it more authentic and iconic.

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  28. I find that as an architect I would not design something so much as to inspire and push for such a vivid image that wows others. The use of this architecture lies on the scene/view. It guides the viewer to the beauty that others already made of topography than my own work that inspires. Instead as a designer you could enhance this natural beauty by including a view and showing the craftsmanship of your own work that is just a beautiful and awe inspiring. As in architecture, the beauty can lay in the details of the experience. This idea is like those of the many beautiful churches across the world. It uses architecture to capture a feeling and awe, manipulation of glass to create feeling being enveloped in light. It strikes divine into the viewer without a natural scene. So, to incorporate such ideas where the architecture creates an awe inspiring moment without scene would be the true goal and how one could create such a feeling/moment in time that directly affects the viewer within your design.

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  29. I find that as an architect I would not design something so much as to inspire and push for such a vivid image that wows others. The use of this architecture lies on the scene/view. It guides the viewer to the beauty that others already made of topography than my own work that inspires. Instead as a designer you could enhance this natural beauty by including a view and showing the craftsmanship of your own work that is just a beautiful and awe inspiring. As in architecture, the beauty can lay in the details of the experience. This idea is like those of the many beautiful churches across the world. It uses architecture to capture a feeling and awe, manipulation of glass to create feeling being enveloped in light. It strikes divine into the viewer without a natural scene. So, to incorporate such ideas where the architecture creates an awe inspiring moment without scene would be the true goal and how one could create such a feeling/moment in time that directly affects the viewer within your design..

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  30. Mason Rempfer:
    I find that as an architect I would not design something so much as to inspire and push for such a vivid image that wows others. The use of this architecture lies on the scene/view. It guides the viewer to the beauty that others already made of topography than my own work that inspires. Instead as a designer you could enhance this natural beauty by including a view and showing the craftsmanship of your own work that is just a beautiful and awe inspiring. As in architecture, the beauty can lay in the details of the experience. This idea is like those of the many beautiful churches across the world. It uses architecture to capture a feeling and awe, manipulation of glass to create feeling being enveloped in light. It strikes divine into the viewer without a natural scene. So, to incorporate such ideas where the architecture creates an awe inspiring moment without scene would be the true goal and how one could create such a feeling/moment in time that directly affects the viewer within your design.

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  31. Personally, I find interest in both houses. I was always one who was interested in the aspect of road trips and seeing cool places. While I naturally would not have lots to say about the architecture specifically since I am not a majr of architecture, I can appreciate places I think look cool. Yes, I think Fallingwater would definitely be the favorite of the two if we are comparing Fallingwater and the Stahl House. However, Stahl house has an amazing view and if I was in fact able to go in and look around, I certainly would and take pictures to document the visit. As an artist, I just like to absorb unique sights and sounds, and the Stahl house would count as a unique sight. I wouldn’t necessarily aim for fame or being iconic, just something uniquely me, and places that I find that were made with a unique design.

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  32. I believe one can always strive for a pictorial moment professionally. However, usually it doesn’t come as easy. I’m sure many of those who are iconic or geniuses didn’t know that one day they would be respected and put up there. I do however want to put my energy and time towards bettering myself and my work. I would love for my work to become iconic, yet I have a mindset knowing not to expect the best but expect the worst. In this sense, I put my energy into what I like myself and how I feel. The iconic part of it is an added bonus.

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  33. Currently speaking in regards to my situation in life No I don’t have the time in a practical sense But I do feel that if I had the time to I would. Right now however my main jobs is being a parent and as such I dedicate the majority of my free time with them as it is the right thing to do and they are only babies once. I think in perceiving it this way I can actually view my experience with my children much like the experience we are discussing since stuff like this doesn’t happen often just like a pictorial moment. when the time comes I do believe that life is ultimately about experiencing so I would not say that this is something I do not strive for professionally but that for right now I strive for something like this closer to home.

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  34. Personally, as an aspiring artist/graphic designer, this pictorial moment is not something that I strive for professionally, not because I don’t like the idea, but because it’s not really something that I am personally interested in. My goal as an artist is to create things that I love to create and am passionate about, not things that are iconic, life-changing, or capable of making people’s jaws drop. Plus, if I had to create something that would be known to millions of people, I feel like I would be under a lot of pressure. It would be especially difficult with where I am now in life, with still learning about the different mediums of art while also trying to “find myself”. I am the kind of person who does things for fun, not for glory. I will only create something that I recall from an iconic experience if I feel passionate enough about it and/or if I think that it is worth creating. I feel like I shouldn’t think ahead and use up so much of my time and energy focusing on iconic experiences, but instead, I should just go with the flow. By this, I mean that I just want to create art out of love and passion. I feel like I have enough in my life right now as it is, so I don’t consider pictorial moments leading to iconic experiences a priority. Though, maybe in my later years, I might consider it. After all, the possibility of a tour inside one of the most famous residences in the Western World does seem rather intriguing and could potentially be a stepping stone in my path to master artistry. It’s just not something that I am particularly interested in at this point in time. Right now, such an iconic experience is too remote an opportunity for me to focus on, and I’d rather just stick to what I love doing.

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