“It’s like Jazz…you improvise.!”

As Frank Gehry was rising through the ranks of architecture, his design philosophy of working from ‘inside out’ was so confusing and unconventional that many first time viewers of his work concluded “I just don’t get it—and I don’t like it!”

Artists—and I include architects here!—have fought the battle of resistance to change by clients, patrons, and the general audience for generations of time. There seems to be a curious ‘connection’ between audience members who really, genuinely enjoy jazz music and those same individuals who accept the ‘willing suspension of disbelief’ attitude when it comes to abstract art! American culture is made up of people who covet change and those who resist any form of movement away from ‘tradition’!

Gehry seeks the quality of ‘inevitability’ in his architectural designs. As all the individual pieces of his design/vision come ‘together’ into a finished structure, the final look not only makes ‘sense’ naturally, one could argue that Gehry has succeeded in creating a space where people conclude they would like to occupy and experience that environment! Frank Gehry’s designs—startling and unconventional to be sure—will grow on you…and rather quickly too! Gehry and his architectural forms connect! When one of his larger structures rise in a city, as his form takes final shape, something magical begins to cast a shadow not only over his structure but over the entire city as well!

Frank Gehry said: “Liquid architecture. It’s like jazz—you improvise, you work together, you play off each other, you make something, they make something. And I think it’s a way of—for me, it’s a way of trying to understand the city, and what might happen in the city.”

What are your thoughts on the ‘signature’ style that has emerged for the great Los Angeles-based architect Frank Gehry within today’s energized cities?

Photograph of Los Angeles-based Architect Frank Gehry

Frank Gehry, Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, Spain, opened 1997
Frank Gehry, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles, opened 2003

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

32 Comments

32 thoughts on ““It’s like Jazz…you improvise.!””

  1. Frank Gehry is an inspirational Architect because his designs and ideas were not ordinary, they were beyond the limits. His uniqueness was not well understood by others, even at school he was more kin towards art instead of architecture. While in architecture school he failed many times in his classes and took him years to graduate. His determination and creativity lead him to become one of the most well-known and successful architect today. Gehry has pushed the limit in designing something that has movement and curves that are extraordinary, which lead to his signature style.
    The signature style Frank Gehry (Los Angeles-based Architect) marked around today’s energized cities is significant. The way the building is designed is based on creating movement and curves that are unfamiliar to most people, he encourages creativity and to think more abstract and other worldly. Most of his designs are truly based on movement and curves but lacks the implementation of regional style (a response to place). His designs may solely be based on the creativity and portray more of a wow factor. The untraditional shapes create an emotional response, it stimulates humans to interact with the building environment. His buildings create this integral connection to look closely and appreciate the uniqueness of the design. His signature design is evident in the Guggenheim Museum in Spain to the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles. The intent leans more towards a signature than a response to the setting.

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  2. Personally, I am a big fan of the work of Frank Gehry. I think he definitely sees architecture as sculpture. His designs take risks in the elements of form and design, but do not lose functionality. I think the addition of his works in any city bring about new perspectives and interest. His work does not only have contrast to other buildings, but compliments the works. I can also see how some people need time to adjust to his pieces, but any kind of change is difficult because it requires growth. Gehry’s signature style certainly energizes cities and provides residents and visitors with a new source of inspiration and alternative thinking. A first hand example I have of this is Gehry’s design of the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, or Cleveland Clinic, here in Las Vegas, NV. I have viewed this building on many occasions and find it so interesting. It really sparks my curiosity because the exterior of the building also compliments the interior. The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health is also situation next to World Market Center which is a monolithic edifice. The undulations, organic shapes, and reflective surface of Gehry’s work has contrast to its neighbor, but both works offer the viewer opportunities to reimagine the skyline of the city. Gehry’s signature style is his imprint on the world and others. It is how he shares his perspective, and I find it very compelling.

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  3. I believe the sentiment that Gehry felt more at home with contemporary artists and sculptors than with his fellow architects. When I look at Gehry’s body of work, I can’t help but think that he approached the creation of these buildings with a sculpture’s eyes; there is sense of abstraction. It’s as if he wasn’t worried if it was possible, but that he had more of a let’s make it work kind of approach. Since these designs are so fluid and ‘improvised’ in nature, I think their designs’ don’t stick to a specific time period, but it finds a way to fit in as the city around it changes. Meaning, that no matter how many years have passed by, his buildings find a way to stay captivating and eye catching no matter how the city has evolved.

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  4. Frank Gehry architecture can be considered confusing and overwhelming at times with his proposal of constructing organic forms that challenge the traditional design. The work by Gehry can be seen first from a contemporary artist’s point of view as his early designs reflect that mentality. The ‘signature’ style he developed was not planned as often architects do not know how the critics will react to your work. The unconventional design of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao was so widely recognized that cities wanted the same kind of recognition generated by a building of similar characteristics. Therefore, the unexpected success influence Gehry to improvised like jazz to duplicate the same quality of architecture without directly copying the same building. The true genius about Gehry’s designs is manipulating similar forms from his style and adapting to the situation by simplifying complicated architecture into orderly chaos.

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  5. I initially found the designs of Frank Gehry to be a bit too chaotic. Over time his works have grown on me as I’ve found a new appreciation for the unique approach he takes. His designs appear to be the closest thing to abstract expressionism found in architecture in my opinion. A truly unique way to go about architecture.

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  6. Gehry’s signature style is one that is easily recognizable by not only architects, architecture and art students but also by people who may not even be connected to art or architecture. I myself have so much trouble remembering what architect produced what building but Frank Gehry – and his work – was one of the first Architects that I could easily remember because of this signature building style. The way he uses stainless steel construction and his bold moves in form for the Guggenheim museum and the Walt Disney concert hall it easily clicked that these projects were both done by Gehry. I’ve never visited the Lou Ruvo Center in town – im sure i’ve driven by once – but i’ve seen many pictures and once studying Gehry, it clicked that his work i’ve learned about looked similar to the Lou Ruvo center and then I found out that Gehry had done that project.

    I was fortunate to get to see the Gehry residence in my third year and being there you definitely can see that it was a Gehry project. Though it may be an unconventional design style but it’s done so well that not only is it something so impactful architecturally but also very impactful artistically

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  7. An architect friend of mine recently said that he thinks a lot of architectural problems (functional, aesthetic, and otherwise) are caused by clients not being able to conceptualize how a space will “live” when translated from a 2D blueprint into a 3D space. Many things that are visually pleasing when built can seem awkward to a layperson reading a plan, he said; it often takes an architect with a strong vision and persuasive communication skills to push through designs that go against the grain of what a client expects to see. His solution was to embrace 3D design rendering software that allowed clients to virtually walk through the design in a simulation of how it will actually be experienced: not as an overhead plan or a 2D rendering but a space with volume.

    I think that people often have the same issue with other art forms. If a work isn’t immediately identifiable as something they recognize and are already comfortable with, it can be a struggle to convince them to experience it with an open mind. When they let go of their preconceived notions, they often find that they DO like it. The exteriors of Frank Gehry’s buildings immediately stand out in a context of anonymous square structures. The facade of the Guggenheim Museum in Spain juts out and folds in on itself like a Cubist painting. While one might immediately react with shock or annoyance at the building (“That’s not how a building is meant to look!”), it’s easy to fall for its charms: the reflective surface that changes over the course of a day, the walls that drape over each other like blankets. It is ultimately an inviting space.

    The first time I listen to a free jazz recording, I’m often overwhelmed. But the more I listen, I begin to pick out familiar elements, rhythmic or melodic tics, small gestures that are enlightening of the overall design. Architecture can be the same.

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  8. I Frank Gehry’s ‘signature’ style fits well within today’s cities, seeing buildings like this is the norm. Los Angeles’s postmodernist styles seem to be in every major city now. I think it has become a staple of urban cityscape, inescapable and interesting. Frank Gehry’s deconstructive buildings are among some of the most memorable to date, their striking and unusual appearance keep you looking and wondering. In Las Vegas, we have Gehry’s the Luo Ruvo Center for Brain Health and it is probably the most unconventional building in our city to date. These designs stick with you over more common building designs that just blend in the rest of the city. Though with buildings like this, is the element of art more important than utilizing space to its fullest potential?

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  9. Frank Gehry’s signature style steps outside of the bounds of the expected and traditional forms of architecture. His works complement the environment that they inhabit, not taking away from, but adding to the scenery and surrounding architecture. There is a dynamic fluidity in his buildings, much like “liquid” or what one might find in a sculpture. In a sense, his buildings are a sculpture, having been formed and molded to bring his artistic vision to life in the form of livable and workable space. He was able to maintain functionality, so that one might not only admire the space but also inhabit it for however long they wish. He creates works that both have a sense of improvision and thoughtfulness. There are similarities between his buildings, but all have their own unique qualities. He is talented in his ability to create in innovative and imaginative ways while still recognizing and serving the needs of the community that the architecture is built for.

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  10. To understand the work of Frank Gehry, you first have to understand his way of thinking when it comes to the built environment and its connection to cities. Gehry rose to prominence as an architect that defined his style from an early start ,whether people understood his work or hated it. An example of this is his Gehry residence, which in it’s Santa Monica neighborhood angered and dismayed its neighbors over a misunderstanding of what the house was. Little did they know it was to become one of the designs that defined and forwarded Gehry’s signature style. Gehry’s unconventional way of thinking about design as an aspect of how art and architecture merge, is why you see such an importance in how the interior defines the exterior of the building and why people some people seem dismayed by his work and others love it. His signature style quickly rose to fame as he began to earn projects throughout the world, such as at the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain.
    Known for his flowing and curved lines, extravagant use of metal panels, and titanium clad facades, Gehry molded his work through experimentation and a belief that transformative ideas were needed to move forward from modernist tendencies. A member of the Los Angeles school, Gehry’s signature style was influential in the development of a new age of architecture across Los Angeles and he also influenced a large generation of architects to think the way he did. His signature style eventually made it to Las Vegas, at the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in what is a project that describes Gehry; it’s non-traditional shapes stimulate the senses and emotions in a building that is all about the research of mental health and brain health. As an architect that revolted against a brand of modernism he deemed inadequate, of course he was to become the great energizer of cities through work that personifies his signature style as the catalyst of its built environment.

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  11. I honestly think Frank Gehry’s style is very refreshing when it comes to architecture. Most buildings follow the standard rectangular model, they are certainly functional but not very exciting to look at. With Gehry’s creations however not only are they fun to look at but they still function as actual buildings. It would be interesting to see a world where architecture in general as more influenced by art than it is now.

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  12. Gehry designs were original and brilliant! Buildings are always the same geometrical shapes with a certain amount of stories to them. However with Frank he was different. His style was bold and new and exciting to see . Remind me of that Cleveland medical building here.
    To compare it to Jazz is a perfect analogy. When I listen to Jazz I am being introduced to a whole new world of instruments. I’m hearing everything come together one sound at a time and his work definitely came together.

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  13. I find Gehry’s work and the style that emerged from his work to be engaging. The photo on slide three with the Wright, Guggenheim NYC 1959 demonstrates how square and blocky cities can be if they don’t let the architects explore new ideas with space, lights, and order. His building stuck out in the photo because it was the only one in the area that was different enough to catch our eyes. I liked how Gehry describes his work like Jazz; I feel and see it in his work with the Guggenheim Bilbao and even in the Walt Disney concert hall, which had a cleaner- crisper look to it. I differently spotted the sailing influence in that design.
    I thought it was interesting that Gehry was worried about his works becoming repetitive in design. Although his clients wanted pieces like Bilbao, he knew he needed to be careful as the style could have easily turned into a one-trick pony. I really appreciate this signature look because it not only encourages individuality to our cities and buildings but also may lead to advancements in engineering. Nothing is ever discovered without exploration, and the more our artists and science do, the more charming our lives become.

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  14. Maria Dos Santos
    Week 11 Response

    I have always deeply respected Frank Gehry as an architect. His innovative work is inspiring as a future architect. I think he has developed an interesting signature style that has emerged for Los Angeles. But on a personal level, I don’t find his architecture particularly as iconic as most people do. I feel like sometimes, his style is so strong that it fails to consider the context of the site in which it fits. It can be overwhelming and I’m not too impressed with the melted metal curves and look. I do agree with Gehry’s statement that “Liquid architecture. It’s like jazz—you improvise, you work together, you play off each other, you make something, they make something. And I think it’s a way of—for me, it’s a way of trying to understand the city, and what might happen in the city.” I understand and respect what Gehry was doing, but in the long list of famous architects, he’s not at the top of my list.

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  15. I am quite fond Frank Gehry’s signature style, and really interested in the chaotic nature of the designs. The architecture is eye catching, fun to view, and makes you want to stop and admire the work, rather than just a simple glance. Without knowing who Frank Gehry was at first, I would always look in awe when driving by his buildings or when looking at photos, and now that I know who he is, I have been searching his designs because I find them intriguing and exciting to look at.

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  16. Frank Gehry’s buildings are well matched to the vibrant energy of modern cities. In some places they break up the monotony of more typical structures and provide the eye with some much needed visual diversity. Many Gehry buildings across the globe, like the Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, the Guggenheim in Bilbao and others are not commercial or residential, they are cultural centers that are in place for the enrichment of the public at large. Cultural institutions are part of what makes any city more than just a collection of buildings. Gehry’s contributions to cities everywhere, including Las Vegas, add a level of excitement and sophistication that comes with having something designed by a world renowned architect.I think a lot of modern city architecture seeks to emulate the energy of a Gehry design. He obviously had a huge impact on architecture and serves as an inspiration to designers everywhere.

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  17. I like that Frank Gehry stayed true to himself in not wanting his art to become a Las Vegas “theme” concept. Don’t get me wrong, I actually enjoy a good theme, I even enjoy a good LV themed casino (I mean they can be fun), however, Gehry is an example of an architect whose authenticity has had lasting results. It’s funny because it is such a small world. Before I took this class, I was not particularly familiar with any famous architects. I mean, of course, there are famous buildings that I could name, but I am more just an admirer and an avid learner when it comes to the arts. I used to volunteer at a law foundation in Downtown Las Vegas and would drive past the Cleveland Clinic on my own way home. I even remember one of my friends said once, “that’s an art museum isn’t it?” Her boyfriend and I laughed super hard because right after she said that, as we drove further past it, we read the sign that said Brain Health. She got pretty mad that we had laughed, but it was funny to us that the function of the clinic was so separate from what she had guessed, less that she had made that mistake. But, I remember this conversation really well because we got into a brief conversation about how art can be found everywhere, and as we can see impactful in various forms! She also wasn’t wrong to think it looked like an art museum, because look at who made it!

    Personally not having known much about the building, I always thought it looked similar to something that I had seen before, and now it makes sense because I have also driven past the Walt Disney Concert Hall many times, and the connection is now clear. I find it interesting that this man does not like themes, and yet in his own art, he has managed to develop an almost thematic signature style in his own work. I really like this in an artist though, because I feel when you can identify an artist, just by looking at his work, an appreciator is able to connect with it on a deeper level. I feel that now if I were to go to Bilbao, I’d be able to say, “Oh that looks like Gehry’s work,” and I’d be able to sense the emotional declaration he is trying to make. While my friends and I before didn’t really make the connection between Brain Health and this building at first, the more I look at it the more I see it. It’s intricate, looks temperamental, and has waves, patterns, and a complexity like the human brain, which can be said about an art museum, a concert hall, or an architect’s stamp of intention. Although my friends and I didn’t know anything about this building at the time of the drive (maybe 4 years ago), this building had and still has the power to speak out to an audience, enough to cause an argument between a couple and myself, haha!

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  18. Frank Gehry is a visionary architect, who’s work is extraordinary in approach but detailed in craft. Each of these design decisions have a thorough consideration and how one will react or perhaps collide with one another. At times these forms have attracted admiration along with confusion. Non the less these grand gestures have demonstrated the boldness in architecture and its ability to be intricate. Gehry’s developed signature style is recognizable, bold and fluid. As stated, often times these forms appear ever natural, seemingly feeling unplanned. Approaching a project, there needs to be this type of approach as it allows for an open ended process. Designers have the ability to generate ideas that surpass the traditional standard. A push for innovation is stimulated through this process. These “styles” that architects have developed are refined processes that have been established. Gehry’s design language is distinct in that it expresses movement, and has demanded a sense of presence. As he often reiterates, he does not take a path that is planned or pre-determined. Some consider his signature repetitive; I would argue that Gehry has mastered his craft by finding his unique method that is streamlined to reflect his design philosophy.

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  19. My thoughts on the innovative architecture style of the Los Angeles based architect Frank Gehry that is designs are abstract, chaotic, and deconstructivism. Frank Gehry approaches the postmodernism architecture style by creating the built form and making it fragmented, disjointed, while at the same time making the building fluid and organic. Gehry’s buildings are so unique that they stand out from the rest of the buildings within the city and become landmarks. Frank Gehry’s design process is one of a kind, where it starts from one piece of crumpled loose sleeve paper to an organic remarkable structure that creates a specific energy for the city that its built within. Gehry’s design philosophy is so unconventional that often first-time critics can’t comprehend the design of the building and don’t like it. I really appreciate Gehry’s unconventional designs because this is what I strive for in my future architectural career is a signature design style that separates me from the rest. Gehry’s design style weather you hate it or love it, you must admire the way he breaks away from traditional design styles and creates unique spaces and buildings of his own

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  20. I’ve never actually heard of Frank Gehry before this class which is extremely interesting since the Keep Memory Alive Center is one of his works. When I first saw it when I was younger I had actually thought it looked quite silly but still interesting next to the World Market Center. It was especially visually enticing when the Vegas sun would hit its metallic exterior with its contoured design. After looking at many of Gehry’s other works I’ve come to appreciate the odd designs of his architecture. His signature style is surely unique to him and I think cities actually benefit with the invigorating, voluminous look of Gehry’s design.

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  21. When you pair the unique architecture of Frank Gehry to the often monotonous architecture of energized cities, it feels like a breath of fresh air in my opinion. While I did not know about Gehry before now, I did recognize his works posted above, particularly the Walt Disney Concert Hall. Additionally, I was immediately reminded of the Keep Memory Alive Event Center on Bonneville in the heart of downtown here in Vegas! When I was an avid bus rider earlier this year and years past, I always loved seeing this building after I was picked up from the transit center to go home. I think his work is exciting and inviting, I want to play around on it honestly, they stop feeling like buildings and more like playgrounds. Of course with our Vegas heat, I am not so sure that it would be a great idea to be anywhere on these entirely metal buildings after being in the sun all day. Overall, I think his ideas should influence other artists more often, as they truly feel like 2D artworks that were simply slapped into our 3D reality. I guess another interesting thing about his work is that it may kind of funny to experience the building from outside with its confusing chaos and step into a normal and functional building. I would really like to do this myself now that I know who designed these buildings and that we have one so close to home.

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  22. I think it is very interesting that Gehry’s buildings have a ‘signature’ style considering he said that he didn’t want to stick to any themes! The more an artist produces and discovers the ways that work for them, the more they tend to repeat those same techniques because, well they work! There is also a beauty in repetition, and Gehry has created his own world over the years through his unique style. I have driven past the brain institute many times and never really took a liking to it; however after seeing the interior and learning about Gehry’s process, I have grown a greater appreciate through understanding. His work brings a fun and playful atmosphere to intercity life.

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  23. Frank Gehry ideology is so new and abstract compare to other architects way of thinking . Frank Gehry way to approach his work is definitely more in the fine art direction. It is a successful creative risk he took. I understand how people don’t appreciate his work because it maybe hard for them to read or want a purpose why it is a certain way. I love the thought of “working inside out” I’ve never heard that before in architecture. It is hard to grasp into yet exciting. Being described as jazz is exact description. It makes me think of Avant-garde jazz in particular because of its loudness , spirals in different directions , and elevates one another. Frank Gehry is decently why I became interested in archetecture.

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  24. Frank Gehry’s signature style is so fun, especially when compared with the regular rectangular buildings. Sure regular buildings do their job, but after looking at Gehry’s work, it feels like we’re missing this element of fun. I’m in love with his work; they show off so much personality. They’re so dynamic and eye catching. I would love to see cities incorporate architecture like this more.

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  25. Frank Gehry’s works, using unusual materials such as plywood, panels, and nets in his architectural works, illustrate deconstructivist architecture. Frank Gehry, the deconstructivist architect, rejects modernism principles, such as the geometric purity of modernism’s form and form-function, instead of disrupting the building’s conventional system manipulating structure. Although his designs received “incomplete looking, unbalanced and rude” comments from some critics, he never compromised his style. And I think that the consistent ‘signature’ aesthetic understanding he stands behind has made him one of the most distinguished and easily recognizable architectural designers of the recent past. Iconic.

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  26. Arron Adams
    Art 473-1001
    While I understand the idea behind the statement “it’s like Jazz…you improvise,” there are two things I feel like pointing out in terms of how these two art forms differ.
    One, the thing with a jazz performance, is that it is rather ephemeral – each performance is unique and the experience lasts only as long as the performance. Whereas architecture, by its very nature, is fairly permanent.
    Second, a jazz performance is something one must, for the most part, seek out to experience. Architecture, on the other hand, is something that everyone nearby will experience – whether they like it or not.
    As far as my personal opinion on Gehry’s architecture, it’s the sort of thing that I would like to visit now and then, but not necessarily the sort of architecture I would want to live in.

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  27. We embrace this type of architecture and it is now encouraged in large cities to create such masterpieces for something different. Architecture always has it’s foundations and supports, the engineers make the structures possible, so being innovative in design to creating buildings that are visually interesting is beyond exceptional. For so long buildings just served as function so why not be innovative and create not just function but unique interest visually. Creating such visual eye candy had been reserved for monuments and important buildings while the function of box like shapes was traditional for anything else made. I find these creations make society more enjoyable to experience and it is accepting to change. Each innovation in architecture like that of free jazz, you create visual rhythm that adds more breathability in a congested feeling city.

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  28. I would say Frank Gehry’s designs do stand out and are a testament to his personal philosophies, and I’m glad he is able to make them. He seems akin to fine artists than other more rational, serious minded architects who look for form and function more than fun. I am sure the forms he creates can be challenging to execute, as ones ideas are heavily tethered to practicality in material, cost, and safety. In jazz, it is safe to say that it is easier to act upon creative impulses than with architecture. Personally, I do see his work as art, its just that I am not a fan of his style, and that’s okay because everyone has their own sense of what is beauty.

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  29. I think it is always a positive when artists of any kind choose to push the boundaries of what their discipline can be. I think it is also possible to appreciate a work of art without it necessarily being to your taste. I personally like Frank Gehry’s work in general, but I can understand why some don’t because a lot of his buildings don’t resemble what we naturally think of as buildings. I think it is human nature to want to know why something is the way it is and it is possible that people do not like his work because they don’t understand why it was designed the way it was. However, I believe that if after a few years the building was to disappear, most people also would miss it and perhaps it would change their perspective on the buildings that have remained – a new appreciation for freshness that they didn’t realize they would miss, perhaps?

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  30. I think the ‘signature’ style that has emerged for the great Los Angeles-based architect Frank Gehry within today’s energized cities is amazing. His buildings are unique and special in some sorts. The usual buildings created are geometric or built similarly. Frank Gehry branches out to other ideas aside from the norm. Sometimes you need something refreshing and different from the norm. I think everyone should try and be unique because it adds excitement and flavor to art and architecture.

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  31. Personally I like Gehry’s work being that I work for Clark County I frequently pass by his building here in town. Of course what first strike you when first looking at it are the confused directions at which the planed of the walls take their trajectory. But upon closer examination you begin to unique design elements used to make the building functionally speaking practical. I feel that Gehry’s work does to some extent represent Los Angeles on visual level as it can be abstractly related to being similar in concept to the Community. To simplify what I am speaking of if we look Gehry’s use of varying wall sizes angles and shapes we can begin to see how these are somewhat a representation of the diversity of Los Angeles. All the walls and structures in Gehry’s buildings serve a purpose in much the same way as all these diverse populations fulfill a need the city has. To sum up I enjoy his work and think it very much a style born out of L.A itself.

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  32. I think that Frank Gehry’s ‘signature’ style of design is interesting and something worth observing. His style may have been unconventional, but that is exactly what made him such an innovative and unique artist for his time; his philosophy of working from ‘inside out’ was apparently seen as “iffy” or “insensible” by viewers, but that’s where his work got its charm. This is also what made him so inspirational as an architect; he designed his buildings in ways that not many people, if any, tried before. I also find it interesting that he compared liquid architecture to jazz of all things, but the analogy made sense after reading about how he compared them. Said analogy also shows that improvisation can be a good thing. At least, it seems that improvisation worked out for Frank Gehry, because now, his buildings are renowned among Los Angeles architects, or just architects in general. I believe that Frank Gehry had a very interesting approach to architecture, one that seemed weird and out of the ordinary to many people at first, particularly to those who were resistant to change, but it was one that ultimately worked out for him in the end.

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