Where We’re At…Architecture, Art, and Design…

Architecture, Art, and Design—are these three terms the same in meaning and context? Are they interconnected so as to be easily collaborated with in the process of being creative? As me move through the early first quarter phase of the 21st Century, a specific time period right now determined and impacted by a global pandemic, how do the terms Architecture, Art, and Design fit into the larger picture?

Brendan Dawes, the UK_based artist and designer is potentially developing/navigating a pathway not only through Covid-19 but also into the not too distant future by incorporating generative process where he “learns” by involving data, machine AI, algorithms, etc. to create.

What are your thoughts on Brendan Dawes quote:

“The difference between art and design is that design is all about answers and art is about the questions.” (Brendan Dawes, Net Magazine, 2014)

As you inch closer to finishing your course of study with a career looming on the horizon, do you want to be the designer answering the questions or the artist asking the questions? Or, perhaps, you want to be both and more! Your thoughts please…

UK-Based Artist and Designer Brendan Dawes
Photograph of Brendan Dawes Research

Published by: roberttracyphd

Academic professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas. I teach theory courses in Art and Architecture History. In addition, I also curate exhibitions on campus as well as in other venues nationally and internationally.

23 Comments

23 thoughts on “Where We’re At…Architecture, Art, and Design…”

  1. January 21, 2021:
    Week 1 Blog: On Brendan Dawes

    I agree with Brenden Dawes that art is about the question and design is about the answer. More so, the old adage says, need is the mother of all invention. I’ll even go as far as to say that art may exist as a prelude for design but it is not necessary while design is the process for architecture.

    Art exists in many forms, it is all subjective, and it may provoke a response whether it is a simple emotion or a compulsion into action, hence design. Art can be visual as an acrylic on canvas; it can be sprayed onto a brick wall; or viewed through a screen in static or dynamic form. It can be represented in 3D like a sculpture. It can also be a space that one enters, or an idea that lives in the mind initiated through the words of a poem, story, or text.

    Design is initiated by art. It can be a question asked then it is internalized with the outcome as action through design. Consider Brendan Dawes project Field Notes Winter Edition, he designed the cover of 99,999 booklets, each with a distinct snowflake produced through interactive algorithm design. These snowflakes refer to the many different notes, ideas, and concepts that might find themselves in the booklets. Each owner of their booklet is master of what shall be inscribed and unique to their own ideas.

    Now, when considering architecture, one finds that the problem presented to an architect is through the needs of the client. The architect is obligated to conceptualize the needs of the client and then design a solution. Whether it is an open space or an enclosed space the design of the space is the process of solving the question of the client. But it does not always become art. What makes architecture art is in the eye of the beholder and it is tested through the passage of time. According to Eugene Raskin, when considering architecture and art; the greater the emotion evoked by architecture then the greater the art. But if architecture evokes no emotion, then it is considered to be just a building. So, in the conversation of architecture, the problem or question is not necessarily the art. First one has the problem to solve, which is different than the art. Where as in Brenden Dawes example the art is the problem or question. Next, the design aspect, becomes the process of solving the problem, which then becomes architecture. Lastly, depending on the magnitude of these emotions these same emotions are what transcend the piece into a great piece of art.

    Like

  2. I re-read this quote from Dawes a few times and I found it helpful to talk it out to get a better understanding of what he was talking about. I framed it by thinking about design and the needs of society, how we have requests for things to be a certain way and designers come along and create the things we wanted and that’s that. Artists are often not provoked by society in the same way- their product serves society by asking questions, often philosophical, that propel thought forward. Design is about solutions, art is about possibilities.

    Like

  3. I agree with the quote from Brendan Hawes to a degree when he said, “the difference between art and design is that design is all about answers and art is about the questions.” I think that the primary function of objects that are considered to be art is to inspire some sort of philosophical thought in the viewer. Art “asks” questions by inspiring people to think more deeply about the nature of their existence; whether the reflection is joyful or painful, all art can be considered art when it performs this function. I would say that the primary function of design is to solve problems of convenience, comfort, or ease of function when it comes to objects or environments that are meant to aid people in their everyday lives. Design answers questions about how to make things more comfortable or enjoyable, or how to more efficiently perform a function. The questions that art asks and the questions that design answers are from different areas of existential concern, however, design has the capability to set the stage for the philosophical thoughts that arise from thinking about art by taking care of the fundamental needs of humans to be comfortable. Once someone has their basic physiological needs of avoidance of pain and being fed, the door to thinking deeply can be opened and walked through.

    Like

  4. January 21, 2021:
    Week 1 Blog: On Brendan Dawes
    I agree with Brenden Dawes that art is about the question and design is about the answer. More so, the old adage says, need is the mother of all invention. I’ll even go as far as to say that art may exist as a prelude for design but it is not necessary while design is the process for architecture.

    Art exists in many forms, it is all subjective, and it may provoke a response whether it is a simple emotion or a compulsion into action, hence design. Art can be visual as an acrylic on canvas; it can be sprayed onto a brick wall; or viewed through a screen in static or dynamic form. It can be represented in 3D like a sculpture. It can also be a space that one enters, or an idea that lives in the mind initiated through the words of a poem, story, or text.

    Design is initiated by art. It can be a question asked then it is internalized with the outcome as action through design. Consider Brendan Dawes project Field Notes Winter Edition, he designed the cover of 99,999 booklets, each with a distinct snowflake produced through interactive algorithm design. These snowflakes refer to the many different notes, ideas, and concepts that might find themselves in the booklets. Each owner of their booklet is master of what shall be inscribed and unique to their own ideas.

    Now, when considering architecture, one finds that the problem presented to an architect is through the needs of the client. The architect is obligated to conceptualize the needs of the client and then design a solution. Whether it is an open space or an enclosed space the design of the space is the process of solving the question of the client. But it does not always become art. What makes architecture art is in the eye of the beholder and it is tested through the passage of time. According to Eugene Raskin, when considering architecture and art; the greater the emotion evoked by architecture then the greater the art. But if architecture evokes no emotion, then it is considered to be just a building. So, in the conversation of architecture, the problem or question is not necessarily the art. First one has the problem to solve, which is different than the art. Where as in Brenden Dawes example the art is the problem or question. Next, the design aspect, becomes the process of solving the problem, which then becomes architecture. Lastly, depending on the magnitude of these emotions these same emotions are what transcend the piece into a great piece of art.

    Like

  5. January 21, 2021:
    Week 1 Blog: On Brendan Dawes
    I agree with Brenden Dawes that art is about the question and design is about the answer. More so, the old adage says, need is the mother of all invention. I’ll even go as far as to say that art may exist as a prelude for design but it is not necessary while design is the process for architecture.

    Art exists in many forms, it is all subjective, and it may provoke a response whether it is a simple emotion or a compulsion into action, hence design. Art can be visual as an acrylic on canvas; it can be sprayed onto a brick wall; or viewed through a screen in static or dynamic form. It can be represented in 3D like a sculpture. It can also be a space that one enters, or an idea that lives in the mind initiated through the words of a poem, story, or text.

    Design is initiated by art. It can be a question asked then it is internalized with the outcome as action through design. Consider Brendan Dawes project Field Notes Winter Edition, he designed the cover of 99,999 booklets, each with a distinct snowflake produced through interactive algorithm design. These snowflakes refer to the many different notes, ideas, and concepts that might find themselves in the booklets. Each owner of their booklet is master of what shall be inscribed and unique to their own ideas.

    Now, when considering architecture, one finds that the problem presented to an architect is through the needs of the client. The architect is obligated to conceptualize the needs of the client and then design a solution. Whether it is an open space or an enclosed space the design of the space is the process of solving the question of the client. But it does not always become art. What makes architecture art is in the eye of the beholder and it is tested through the passage of time. According to Eugene Raskin, when considering architecture and art; the greater the emotion evoked by architecture then the greater the art. But if architecture evokes no emotion, then it is considered to be just a building. So, in the conversation of architecture, the problem or question is not necessarily the art. First one has the problem to solve, which is different from art. Whereas in Brenden Dawes example the art is the problem or question. Next, the design aspect, becomes the process of solving the problem, which then becomes architecture. Lastly, depending on the magnitude of these emotions these same emotions are what transcend the piece into a great piece of art.

    Like

  6. I have ever tried to define the term Art formally, in fact, I have literally googled it looking for a rigorous definition, and I have never succeeded. I have found “classic” definitions that spoke of dance, sculpture, architecture … or even cinema, but I never found a definition in a sentence. Regarding design, it is a term that escapes me even more, more difficult to conceptualize what it is exactly, but I do understand that it is not the same as art. At this moment I am a master’s student of architecture, and I see myself saying “I am an architectural designer”, but not “I am an architectural artist”, I reserve that as for a higher level of professionals of the profession.

    And, for the first time, in this definition by Brendan Dawes I find this definition of both terms.

    It is very accurate that in this post under his profile photo reads “UK-Based Artist and Designer Brendan Dawes”, because looking at his work you can see that he is both an artist and a designer.
    I appreciate his facet as an artist in the approach of using data, algorithms, and electronics in his work, he asks, can beauty (order) be found in (apparent) chaos?
    In a similar way to those who create techno music, from loops and samplers, Dawes answers this question with his facet as a designer, with his masterful handling of shape and color, resulting in his work, which I will call parametric, of the utmost magnitude of beauty (and paradoxically of order).

    At the beginning of the post he cites the pandemic, and raises how do the terms Architecture, Art, and Design fit into the actual panorama? Baron Rothschild said, “Buy when there’s blood in the streets, even if the blood is your own.” … I’m sure that when this pandemic ends (hopefully!) Hundreds of movies and books will be made, the question is, what can we do now? what circumstances, tools, or special events there are now for it. For example, I remember the Strip in Las Vegas totally deserted a few months ago, an unheard-of fact, ideal for performances, filming …?

    Finally, about me, what kind of future career, I like that definition of the Renaissance Homo Universalis as an architect, painter, sculptor. I have worked as an artistic painter (a kind of) and I do my first steps with sculpture (digital), so let’s update that definition of Homo Universalis as an Architect, painter, sculptor … and designer.

    Like

  7. Lizbeth Ramirez | Art 434

    Beginning with the first question of “Architecture, Art, and Design – are these three terms the same in meaning and context” I would respond with no. For example, Individually they all have their own personalities, thoughts, and styles but when they group up they are able to create such amazing experiences.

    Specifically thinking of these three terms in the context of now, the place Area 15 comes to mind. Growing up in Las Vegas, all we pretty much had was the strip and downtown Fremont street, but when it came to museums or art we didn’t have much. Recently, during the pandemic Area, 15 opened up. The Architecture of the place is so different from the outside to the inside. From the outside, you see a plain building, just a box. When you look at the entrance it seems to be very large and guarded, but that’s where the design comes in, which created a portal to another dimension. When you’re inside everything is so colorful and lively. So Dawe’s quote “The difference between art and design is that design is all about answers and art is about the questions,” makes sense to me. When I entered this so-called portal to the other dimension, I had so many questions that were inspired by the art. The more I discovered about the design of the place it was able to answer those questions for me.

    I also think about how art asks questions because art is meant to start conversations, good or bad, we want people to talk about what they see. I feel once we start those conversations and begin to really look at the design of the work, those questions begin to find answers.

    At the root of these three terms of Art, Architecture, and Design is that when you combine them they don’t just create a work of art, but they create a full-on experience! Looking at Brendan Dawe’s work he creates these interactive installations combining these elements and the outcome is just meant to create an experience for you, which is amazing!

    Like

  8. I think that art and design BOTH require questions and answer, and I believe the only difference is execution for a certain result. Design can be something practical (i.e. stairs were designed to help us reach higher or lower levels), so questions and answers are necessary (i.e. How would I safely ascend a compact two story building? Maybe the stairs should be in a spiral shape to save space.) Artists may ask, “Why does my painting of a face look off?” and answer, “I think it is because the proportions are off.” The result that designers want isn’t whether something looks good or is satisfying enough like artists do, it is more if something is, or at least looks, practical.

    Like

  9. Before I started college, I always though that designers and artists were the same and served the same purpose—which was obviously incorrect. My perspective began to change when I began to learn more about graphic design. I realized that I would rather be a designer answering questions rather than asking the questions as an artist. I find it more rewarding to solve people’s design problems. I would like to help clients figure out how to re-brand their company or creating a product that helps people.

    Like

  10. Overall, I agree with Brendon Dawes viewpoint that art represents questions while design answers questions. An example of how art is about questions can be seen in art galleries. Consider historical paintings that are placed in art galleries today, some of the meanings of the artworks are still up to debate. In especially old pieces of art from centuries ago which we do not have the artist’s interpretation of their own work. Take a look at any of the pieces by Vincent Van Gogh, Diego Rivera, Hilma af Klint, and other past artists whose art is well known. Simply a small object in the background or the foreground of any of their art makes one question the meaning and intent of the artists; from people questioning whether the small shape or objects could represent the artists’ political views if the art held hidden religious meanings, and that just makes one wonder the meaning of the art. Whether we are looking at modern or past works of art their pieces are meant to make the viewers question the potential meanings, why certain colors were used, and many other questions.
    Designs on the other hand are often specifically designed for a purpose such as for a company, logos, sponsors, interior design, or billboards. Graphic artists design new logos for well-known companies all the time and those companies usually want a design that follows a certain format. The Firefox web browser has changed multiple times through different designers yet the design itself remains nearly the same. It is designed to have the fox wrapped around the circle icon and very little changes. Now other designs are not as specific, but they all are meant to represent a specific thing. Moving on from logos, one can consider clothing designs for a company as another example of designs answering the questions. When making a design for a company it has to stay within certain boundaries to be considered a part of the company and for it to be obvious that it is from that brand. Overall, I agree that designs are usually made to answer questions since they are used to represent a specific thing. Meanwhile, art does not always have a certain meaning attached to it therefore art already draws up more questions than designs when just considering the meaning behind them.

    Like

  11. That’s a very interesting take from Dawes quote of art being about questions while designs are all the answers and I think I might have to agree with that. When it comes to art, the subject can come in many forms that can be self-expressive or insinuate a specific topic that the audience have to ask themselves what it is. There’s always questioning a piece of art such as why did the artist choose the colors they did, the execution they chose, what is important and why. With design, that can also be interpreted in many ways, but they are more so direct. It leaves no questions because whatever the design the creator made, it is the way it should be and for a reason. Whether to complement a piece or show what it’s trying to say to the audience. Might be a bit confusing with how I worded it, but hopefully it made sense.
    In all honesty, I’d actually be both! I was a graphic design major, but felt art was what I wanted to pursue more than the competitive nature of graphic design. Or so if anything, I could definitely learn a bit of graphic design on my own while pursuing art. I want my audience to question why I executed a piece the way I did, but also give subtle hints on answers within a piece to answer their questions. As an artist, I like to create pieces where for example a character is in pain, but from what? That’s where my audience questions why and I like to get them thinking and invested in my work! As an admirer of some great artists, I love to take a look at pieces and question the story behind a piece or want to know the why’s and how’s.

    Like

  12. Thinking about Brendan Dawes quote I thought that it was quite interesting on how he separated the term design and art, because I thought they were somewhat similar to each other and share the same vision. However, now I can see why Dawes would separate the two because design is definitely about finding the right solution to a problem, since you are going to ask yourself during the art process, “is this the right design?” As for myself I would want to be answering and solving the question to any project, but I also feel that doing both would be a great balance while working because I always felt it was an amazing feeling doing both parts.

    Like

  13. Overall, I do agree with Brendan Dawes’ point that design is the answer and art is the question, however I view both as being interchangeable in how they are approached. For instance, the design might the solution in how the viewer must interpret the piece, but art may also be created as an answer to certain emotions or intent the artist has and is trying to portray to the viewer. Additionally, when one reflects on design as a whole, there is typically a purpose behind why the piece was created in the first place, leading one to question how the design came to be and what is needed in that design to further, allowing room for the design to be interpreted in a much more abstract manner.

    With this thought in mind, I would like to be the designer and artist that uses the question and answer approach equally. As I plan to enter a career that heavily relies on artistic and technological ability simultaneously, I find that being able to develop questions, as well as answers to those questions, can be helpful in creating projects that can either be immediately recognizable in intent to the viewer and serves as a solution, while also creating projects that are more abstract and allow room for the viewer to ask questions as to why a piece came to be in the first place.

    Like

  14. The three terms Architecture, Art and Design can be looked at as connections of cohesive and differentiating ideas. As a whole, these three terms inherently influences one another. For some, Architecture & design is a form or Art, or Art as a generative design process. Brendan Dawes states that the design is about answers while art is about questions. I would argue that these differences are vice versa. When I think about design, I understand the premise of iteration, development and challenges. Though a design may reach an understandable conclusion, there is room for further exploration. With Art, there is an appreciation of abstraction, either intended or not. The medium allows many forms and processes to take place, thus resulting a completed piece. Yet again, there is room for further interpretation and creativity.

    As an Architecture student, I hope to assume the roles of a designer and artist. To find balance between both ensures a collaborative process. As an artist you’re free to develop different forms through different mediums. As a designer we take on the role of refining and enhancing a conceptual idea. This overall, can lead to results that are well defined through the practice of form and function. In this field of study, we have had to understand how our concepts are interpreted, and how we would like that dialogue to unravel. The pandemic has reminded us how significant flexibility is and the crucial need to be adaptive in such field. Dawes has exemplified how forging a path forward can be different yet effective.

    Like

  15. I somewhat agree with Brendan Dawes’s thought-provoking quote. I have always seen design, especially when designing for a client, a way to answer questions. Design just seems to imply more professional work. I can also see how art is more all-encompassing and therefore has the purpose of asking questions rather than answering them. When I think of art, I do think of fantastical paintings and concept designs that are out of this world. Different styles such as abstract or experimental art exist out there because artists keep asking, ‘what if?’ What if gravity didn’t exist? What if the fairytales were real and mermaids and dragons coexisted with us?

    Architecture, on the other hand, is a completely different concept. It’s very specific to the structural design of different structures and buildings. In my opinion, architecture also answers questions, just like design does. They constantly create blueprints for buildings that have structural integrity and a flair of design that makes them unique.

    Like

  16. I believe art, design, and architecture are part of the same whole. They are all creative processes, though they reach different goals due to their limitations. For example, architecture can be creative or simple or anything that art could be, but it is limited as architecture needs to follow a code to become a house or building or whatnot. As for his quote, I agree. Design is the finished product and meant to serve a purpose, so it is the response to the answer of “what to do with this”. You see design and only see it as it’s existence, not as the process it was. Art on the other hand is created to bring about questions. The questions can be simple or thought-provoking, but they are still questions.

    Like

  17. I agree with Dawes quote in the context of its purpose. I believe that art intends to give audiences questions which do not need to be answered whereas design intends to answer or solve certain questions. As a graphic design student, I have learned and agreed that a designer differs from an artist in that the designer can be called a “problem solver” or “visual communicator.” Architecture can be a bit different in that it does not directly solve problems, but contrast to art that does need to have any purpose, architecture always holds its purpose or meaning. Although design and art do have this differences, like I’ve said, because design has its root in art, I believe that both fields are strongly connected.

    Like

  18. I agree with Dawes quote in the context of its purpose. I believe that art intends to give audiences questions which do not need to be answered whereas design intends to answer or solve certain questions. As a graphic design student, I have learned and agreed that a designer differs from an artist in that the designer can be called a “problem solver” or “visual communicator.” Architecture can be a bit different in that it does not directly solve problems, but contrast to art that does need to have any purpose, architecture always holds its purpose or meaning. Although design and art do have this differences, like I’ve said, because design has its root in art, I believe that both fields are strongly connected.

    Like

  19. From the beginning I wanted to answer the question about the difference about the three terms (but I knew there were more questions at the end). Firstly, I think Architecture is a type of Art, while design is like an element of aspect required in the process of artmaking. In other words, they are all connected, but they don’t mean the same.
    About Brendan Dawes quote, it makes sense. Art raises questions to the people who contemplate its products, while designing is part of the planning part of artmaking. By designing, the artist is making elements to work together, and either it is an architectural problem or not, whatever the product was designed for, it is with a purpose. I like to be both: make art to raise questions than can lead to answers I could not even imagine, and make designs to solve some of the questions and overcome with my art the presented challenges.

    Like

  20. When I first began my college art classes, I thought that art and design could be used interchangeably and that it didn’t matter if I told people I wanted to be an artist or a designer because they were the same thing to me. However after I got deeper into my Graphic Design major, I realized that there was a vast difference between the two terms, just as Brendan Dawes had said. When I started college, I began to focus more on design and looking into the research and problem-solving that each project required. Design is not only effective in communication but efficient as well, where less is always more. Brendan Dawes’ The Art of Cybersecurity is interesting to me because I’ve also just begun learning C++ for my minor in computer science. The visuals and thought-process behind his shapes and forms blow my mind as I can’t imagine not only creating the visual effects but actually coding them too.

    During the pandemic, I found myself with a lot more free time, and so I decided to go back to my highschool hobbies of painting. I realized that I still really love creating art. Going back to Dawes’ quote, I think that maybe artists like to create their own problems and solve it in their own way. For example, if an artist draws something, it only has to be recognizable to them and be to their liking, even if it means painting a tiger pink because that’s how they imagine it. But a designer has to make something that everyone will understand and recognize instantly, and so the tiger must be orange. For my future career, I know that I’d like to be both an artist and a designer, even if it means being both at separate times.

    Like

  21. I’ve always gone back and forth on my standing with the debate of whether we should group Architecture, Art, and Design into the same category. I would say that I think all of them can be considered under the ‘umbrella term’ of art, but they are artistic in different ways. For example, a building can be beautiful, but not in the same way that a painting is beautiful. The same could be said about a movie poster vs a modern house, or an ancient chapel vs an ad we see on the street. All these things are art and are visually compelling in their own ways that are appropriate for their specific context/environment.

    I thought that Dawes’ quote was interesting, especially as someone who has studied both fine art and graphic design. I do believe that I agree with what he is saying. I am a graphic design major, and through my years of doing and studying design, I’ve come to learn that about 90% of it is problem solving. Like Dawes says, when you’re designing you’re in search of a solution – “how can I convey a message in a way that will benefit my audience?” When you design something like an ad or a poster, you want it to be compelling, eye-catching, but also harmonious and visually appealing. On the other hand, when I studied fine art, I found that my thought process was a bit different. I wasn’t trying so much to ‘problem solve’, but was rather thinking about how I could make my audience think by making use of things like metaphors and subtle symbolism. However, despite the differences in my thought processes, I still think that both forms of creativity should be considered ‘art’.

    After experiencing both the ‘answer’ side and the ‘questioning’ side of art – as Dawes says – I think that I prefer the problem solving side better – which is good since that is what I’m majoring in! I tend to like problem solving and thinking about logic, but I also love diving into my creative side, and design is a great mix of the two. I find myself loving design so much because I get to be creative while also thinking of my art logically. While I did enjoy fine art when I was studying it, I found that I wasn’t as good with expression as other artists around me. I felt as if I was creative, but just not in that way, so I definitely think I would much rather be a designer answering questions than an artist asking questions.

    Like

  22. Architecture, art, and design I believe are all close but are different in meaning and context. Although all these disciplines require the use of creativity, I think that their purpose and meanings are very different from one another. A building could be beautiful when it comes to the art of architecture, but compared to art and design, it would mean something entirely different. They can all be considered “art” but at the same time they are all different in their own way.
    Regarding Dawes’ quote, I do agree with what he said about the difference between art and design. When it comes to designing something, I am trying my best to make it simple as well as straightforward as possible for the audience, but also be able to stand out and be “different” from everything else. When I did art in the past, it was more so an expression of my inner self, as well as thinking of what emotions or feelings it would evoke from the people viewing my work.
    As a graphic design student, I believe that I would be more suited towards the side of the designer answering the questions. I enjoy being creative and expressing my thoughts and emotions, but I always find it really satisfying being able to solve problems when it comes to designing things. And it’s not like I lose my creative abilities either, so I kind of get the best of both worlds.

    Like

  23. Architecture, art, and design I believe are all close but are different in meaning and context. Although all these disciplines require the use of creativity, I think that their purpose and meanings are very different from one another. A building could be beautiful when it comes to the art of architecture, but compared to art and design, it would mean something entirely different. They can all be considered “art” but at the same time they are all different in their own way.

    Regarding Dawes’ quote, I do agree with what he said about the difference between art and design. When it comes to designing something, I am trying my best to make it simple as well as straightforward as possible for the audience, but also be able to stand out and be “different” from everything else. When I did art in the past, it was more so an expression of my inner self, as well as thinking of what emotions or feelings it would evoke from the people viewing my work.

    As a graphic design student, I believe that I would be more suited towards the side of the designer answering the questions. I enjoy being creative and expressing my thoughts and emotions, but I always find it really satisfying being able to solve problems when it comes to designing things. And it’s not like I lose my creative abilities either, so I kind of get the best of both worlds.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s